Police Police

An LAPD officer trains inside a force option simulator at the police department's headquarters in March. Frank Stoltze/KPCC hide caption

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Frank Stoltze/KPCC

In LA, Renewed Focus On Training Police On When To Shoot, And When Not To

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Mourners gather for the funeral of Harris County Deputy Darren Goforth, killed as he pumped gas in a surprise attack in August. According to new national statistics, 42 police officers were shot and killed in 2015. Aaron M. Sprecher/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron M. Sprecher/Getty Images

Number Of Police Officers Killed By Gunfire Fell 14 Percent In 2015, Study Says

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Protesters and members of the group Puncture The Silence rally against the shooting of 12-year-old Tamir Rice at Public Square on Nov. 24, 2014 Lisa DeJong/The Plain Dealer via Landov hide caption

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Lisa DeJong/The Plain Dealer via Landov

Members of the Los Angeles Police Department's elite Metropolitan Division participate in a simulation of a Paris-style coordinated attack. The team was tested on response time to converge on this site. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

In Wake Of Attacks, U.S. Cities Step Up Terrorism Simulations

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Shawn Alexander and Ashley Jimenez visit a madrassa in the Los Angeles area. The two police officers are part of the Los Angeles Police Department's counterterrorism bureau, which is focused on fostering community engagement. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Counterterrorism Cops Try To Build Bridges With Muslim Communities

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Demonstrators call for the resignation of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy and Cook County State's Attorney Anita Alvarez during a protest on Nov. 24 following the release of a video showing Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing teenager Laquan McDonald. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Answering The Tough Question Of Who Polices The Police

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Rosa Parks, whose refusal to give up her seat touched off the Montgomery bus boycott and the beginning of the civil rights movement, is fingerprinted by police Lt. D.H. Lackey in Montgomery, Ala., Feb. 22, 1956, when she was among several others charged with violating segregation laws. Gene Herrick/AP hide caption

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Gene Herrick/AP

In Montgomery, Rosa Parks' Story Offers A History Lesson For Police

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Demonstrators march through downtown Chicago on Tuesday following the release of a video showing Jason Van Dyke, a police officer, shooting and killing Laquan McDonald. Van Dyke is charged with first-degree murder for the October 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. So far this year, 15 officers have been charged with murder or manslaughter resulting from an on-duty shooting. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Since Ferguson, A Rise In Charges Against Police Officers

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Paris Prosecutor Francois Molins delivers a press conference Tuesday about the Nov. 13 attacks that claimed 130 lives in the French capital. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images