Police Police

Detective Mark Williams (right) speaks with an officer in Richmond, Va. A decade ago, amid a surge in violent crime, Richmond police were identifying relatively few murder suspects. So the police department refocused its efforts to bring up its "clearance rate." Alex Matzke for NPR hide caption

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Alex Matzke for NPR

Open Cases: Why One-Third Of Murders In America Go Unresolved

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Many of LA's Skid Row residents live in makeshift tents. Kelly McEvers hide caption

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Kelly McEvers

Understanding Skid Row's Tensions After A Fatal Police Shooting

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Indiana "Indy" Bones reports for duty on a field investigation, in which the dog sniffs to detect human remains for a reopened cold case. Gloria Hillard for NPR hide caption

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Gloria Hillard for NPR

Police Dog On Payroll: 'Indiana Bones' Is Woman's Best Friend

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Body cameras, like this one shown at a 2014 press conference in Washington, D.C., are small enough to be clipped to an officer's chest. Washington and Denver are among U.S. cities trying the cameras. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

When Police Are Given Body Cameras, Do They Use Them?

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The 2,100-person Tijuana municipal police force is one of Mexico's largest. It's also the first in the country to employ body cameras for its officers. Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Washington Post/Getty Images

Tijuana Cops Turn On Body Cameras And Hope To Turn Off Bribery

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Madison Mayor Paul Soglin addresses a crowd of protesters on Martin Luther King Boulevard in Madison, Wis., during a protest of the shooting death of Tony Robinson. Andy Manis/AP hide caption

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Andy Manis/AP

Racial Tension Draws Parallels, But Madison Is No Ferguson

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Ferguson, Mo., Police Chief Thomas Jackson is resigning after a scathing Justice Department report showed racial bias in the department and the city's courts. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Task Force Calls For Independent Probes Of Police-Involved Shootings

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A cellphone video captured the deadly struggle between Los Angeles police officers and a man on a city sidewalk (in background). Seconds after this image appears in the video, shots were fired that killed the man, a robbery suspect. Anthony Blackburn/Facebook hide caption

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Anthony Blackburn/Facebook

Late last month, a scuffle cut short a St. Louis Board of Aldermen meeting where a committee was to discuss a proposed civilian review board for the city's police force. Robert Cohen/Courtesy of St. Louis Post-Dispatch hide caption

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Robert Cohen/Courtesy of St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Police Are Learning To Accept Civilian Oversight, But Distrust Lingers

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Yonkers community activist Hector Santiago demonstrates the "stop-and-shake" with Lt. Pat McCormack of the Yonkers Police Department. The idea, Santiago says, is to get people to introduce themselves to cops on the street. Courtesy of Hector Santiago hide caption

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Courtesy of Hector Santiago

Instead Of Stop-And-Frisk, How About Stop-And-Shake?

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Chirag Patel stands in his neighborhood in Madison, Ala., where his father, Sureshbhai Patel, was severely injured by police. Visiting from India, the elder Patel was staying with his son, his wife and child in their Madison home. Sarah Cole/AL.COM /Landov hide caption

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Sarah Cole/AL.COM /Landov