Police Police

President Obama is condemning the unrest in Baltimore, saying a handful of "criminals" are taking advantage of the situation following the April 19 death of Freddie Gray. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Robert Bates (left), a Tulsa County, Okla., reserve deputy, leaves his arraignment Tuesday with his attorney. Bates fatally shot a suspect who was pinned down by officers, raising alarms about volunteer police officers who wear badges and carry guns. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Too Often, Some Say, Volunteer Officers Just Want To Play Cop

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Makeshift memorials to Walter Scott sprouted up at the scene of his fatal encounter with Michael Slager, the police officer who shot him in the back as he ran away following a routine traffic stop. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Multiple lawsuits accuse the New York City Police Department of pressuring officers into fulfilling monthly quotes for tickets and arrests, resulting in warrantless stops. The NYPD denies the allegations. Spencer Platt/Getty hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty

Despite Laws And Lawsuits, Quota-Based Policing Lingers

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Detective Mark Williams (right) speaks with an officer in Richmond, Va. A decade ago, amid a surge in violent crime, Richmond police were identifying relatively few murder suspects. So the police department refocused its efforts to bring up its "clearance rate." Alex Matzke for NPR hide caption

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Alex Matzke for NPR

Open Cases: Why One-Third Of Murders In America Go Unresolved

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Many of LA's Skid Row residents live in makeshift tents. Kelly McEvers hide caption

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Kelly McEvers

Understanding Skid Row's Tensions After A Fatal Police Shooting

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Indiana "Indy" Bones reports for duty on a field investigation, in which the dog sniffs to detect human remains for a reopened cold case. Gloria Hillard for NPR hide caption

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Gloria Hillard for NPR

Police Dog On Payroll: 'Indiana Bones' Is Woman's Best Friend

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Body cameras, like this one shown at a 2014 press conference in Washington, D.C., are small enough to be clipped to an officer's chest. Washington and Denver are among U.S. cities trying the cameras. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

When Police Are Given Body Cameras, Do They Use Them?

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The 2,100-person Tijuana municipal police force is one of Mexico's largest. It's also the first in the country to employ body cameras for its officers. Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Washington Post/Getty Images

Tijuana Cops Turn On Body Cameras And Hope To Turn Off Bribery

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Madison Mayor Paul Soglin addresses a crowd of protesters on Martin Luther King Boulevard in Madison, Wis., during a protest of the shooting death of Tony Robinson. Andy Manis/AP hide caption

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Andy Manis/AP

Racial Tension Draws Parallels, But Madison Is No Ferguson

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