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The Metro Nashville Police Department released a photo showing Travis Reinking in the back of a police car moments after being arrested on Monday. Metro Nashville Police Department via AP hide caption

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Metro Nashville Police Department via AP

In this Aug. 25, 2017, image made from video and released by the Asheville, N.C., Police Department, Johnnie Jermaine Rush grimaces after officer Christopher Hickman overpowers Rush in a chokehold. Earlier this year, a shorter clip obtained by a newspaper sparked anger in the community and helped lead to a felony charge of assault by strangulation against former officer Hickman. Asheville Police Department via AP hide caption

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Asheville Police Department via AP

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor speaks at a civics event in January in Seattle. Sotomayor wrote a scathing dissent about police shootings Monday. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Police Shootings Stir Outrage Among Some, But Not The Supreme Court

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Black Lives Matter activists in Sacramento gathered on Friday to protest the death of Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man who was fatally wounded by police. At a vigil for Clark the next day, a woman was hit by a vehicle. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In this Nov. 24, 2015, file photo, Chicago police officers line up outside the District 1 central headquarters in Chicago, during a protest for the fatal police shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. Paul Beaty/AP hide caption

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Paul Beaty/AP

An elderly man lights a candle during a rally against the murder of Brazilian councilwoman and activist Marielle Franco, in Sao Paulo Brazil on March 15, 2018. Brazilians mourned for the Rio de Janeiro councilwoman and outspoken critic of police brutality who was shot in the city center in an assassination-style killing. Miguel Schincariol /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Schincariol /AFP/Getty Images

On Dec. 21, 2017, Trina Singleton holds a photo of her eldest son Darryl who was murdered in 2016. The Philadelphia Obituary Project, a new website, is working to show that homicide victims in Philadelphia are more than statistics. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

The Philadelphia Obituary Project Chronicles Lives Lost To Violence

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In an effort to curb gun violence, Seattle police are now following up in person on court orders requiring people to surrender guns. Emily Fennick / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Emily Fennick / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

What It Takes To Get Guns Out Of The Wrong Hands

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Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart in Robbins, Ill., on Nov. 19, 2013. Dart says many suburban departments have a hard time just getting officers to patrol the town. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

What Happens When Suburban Police Departments Don't Have Enough Money?

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Members of the San Leandro Police Department SWAT Team during a planned training exercise in 2013. The FBI has been monitoring "swatting" — made-up crimes called in to 911 that are designed to get SWAT teams to deploy — for nearly 10 years. Stephen Lam/Reuters hide caption

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Stephen Lam/Reuters

Big Tech Improvements To 911 System Raise The Risk Of More 'Swatting'

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The mass shooting in Las Vegas this month was one of the latest incidents to draw listeners to apps allowing the public to listen to police and fire frequencies. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

A police officer in Redford Township, Mich., leads Michael Zaydel to jail after he turned himself in, delivering doughnuts and a bagel while he was at it. Redford Township Police Department hide caption

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Redford Township Police Department