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A body camera from Taser is seen during a press conference on Sept. 24, 2014 in Washington, DC. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

Police Are Investing In New Technology. 'Thin Blue Lie' Asks, 'Does It Work?'

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Anton Black's heart condition and mental illness were significant factors in his "sudden cardiac death" during a struggle with law enforcement officers on Maryland's Eastern Shore, according to an autopsy report. LaToya Holley via AP hide caption

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LaToya Holley via AP

Sheila Reid, whose son Jerame was shot and killed by police in 2014, urged Gov. Phil Murphy to sign a bill requiring the state to investigate all police-involved deaths. Ang Santos/WBGO hide caption

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Ang Santos/WBGO

Suhai Aziz Talpur, seen in her office in Karachi's Clifton police station, has emerged as a hero in Pakistan after she led a mission to take down militants who stormed the Chinese consulate in November. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

Flanked by attorney Ben Crump, Emantic Bradford Sr. discusses the results of a forensic examination on his son Emantic "EJ" Bradford Jr., who was fatally shot by police after a shooting in a shopping mall on Thanksgiving Day, after being mistaken for a suspect. Jay Reeves/AP hide caption

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Jay Reeves/AP

More Police Training Key To Determining Who Is A 'Good Guy' With A Gun

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The body of Chicago police Officer Samuel Jimenez, who was killed in the shooting at Mercy Hospital, was escorted Monday evening to the office of the medical examiner in Chicago. Kamil Krzaczynski /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kamil Krzaczynski /AFP/Getty Images

Deputy sergeant Mauwa Saleh is the coordinator of the seven Gender and Children desks in Zanzibar. These desks are staffed by police officers who have received training on how to interview victims and investigate reports of gender-based violence. Rebecca Grant for NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Grant for NPR

A screenshot from "KIKI Challenge | In my feelings Challenge | Shiggy Challenge | Funcho Entertainment | FC," a video by Funcho Entertainment. Funcho Entertainment via YouTube/screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Funcho Entertainment via YouTube/screenshot by NPR

Pedestrians walk outside the closed Spruce St. Starbucks store on May 29, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images

When Calling The Po-Po Is A No-No

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When the First Congregational Church of Oakland decided to hang a Black Lives Matter sign, they started a conversation that led them to try to stop calling police, especially on people of color. Sandhya Dirks /KQED hide caption

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Sandhya Dirks /KQED

Oakland Church Steps Out On Faith And Pledges To Stop Calling Police

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LAPD Deputy Chief Dennis Kato tracks crime statistics in near real time and searches across databases using new, more powerful analytics tools. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

How Data Analysis Is Driving Policing

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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that police need a warrant to obtain cellphone location information routinely collected by wireless providers. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

In Major Privacy Win, Supreme Court Rules Police Need Warrant To Track Your Cellphone

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Jose Luis Conde (center) listens to news media while seated between his mother, Rosa Conde, and his attorney Bret Royle at Royle's office in Phoenix on Thursday. Royle released Mesa police body cam videos showing officers punching Conde, who was unarmed, and later mocking him while he was lying on a hospital room floor after his Jan. 28 arrest. Terry Tang/AP hide caption

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Terry Tang/AP