insurance : Shots - Health News insurance

Physical therapy as well as cognitive therapy are part of a promising approach to managing chronic pain without drugs. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

The Senate health committee meets next month to discuss ways to stabilize the insurance markets. Insurers have until Sept. 27 to commit to selling policies on the ACA marketplaces in 2018. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Andrew Ladd and Fumiko Chino at their wedding in 2006, after his cancer diagnosis. Ladd died the following year, leaving behind hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical debt. Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino hide caption

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Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino

Widowed Early, A Cancer Doctor Writes About The Harm Of Medical Debt

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Amanda Chaffin comforts son Kayden, 4, who has a genetic condition called spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA, and depends on a ventilator to breathe. Chaffin is worried about the high costs of Kayden's care. Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Tax Credits, Penalties And Age Rating: Parsing The GOP Health Bill

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People will still be able to buy health insurance if they have pre-existing conditions, but its not clear how healthy the health insurance market would be under the GOP bill. andresr/Getty Images hide caption

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andresr/Getty Images

How Will People Who Are Already Sick Be Treated Under A New Health Law?

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A flaming replica of 17th-century London floats on the River Thames on Sunday, part of an event to mark the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London. Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images
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Patients Want To Price-Shop For Care, But Online Tools Unreliable

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Mark Patterson, owner of PATCO Construction in Sanford, Maine, boosted his security and bought cybercrime insurance after his company lost more than $500,000 to cyberfraud. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie/NPR

As Cybercrime Proliferates, So Does Demand For Insurance Against It

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Nurses Patricia Wegener (left) and Susan Davis at Mercy Hospital can monitor the condition of a patient who is miles away via the hospital's technology. But some health insurers and analysts remain skeptical that telemedicine saves money. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Telemedicine Expands, Though Financial Prospects Still Uncertain

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Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan (left) has proposed a $275,000 cap on auto-related medical coverage in order to make auto insurance more affordable. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Why Some Detroit Residents Claim To Live Someplace Else

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Some auto insurance companies could be using a tactic called "price optimization" to charge loyal customers a higher premium. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Being A Loyal Auto Insurance Customer Can Cost You

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You don't need to run a marathon — or wear a gorilla suit — to get a discount on John Hancock's new life insurance program. But at least one of them may help. Rick Rycroft/AP hide caption

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Rick Rycroft/AP

Kathy Hanlon and her sons, Sergio (left) and Cristian, were traumatized by Superstorm Sandy. Hanlon says her flood insurance company made life after Sandy even more horrible Charles Lane/NPR hide caption

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Charles Lane/NPR

Superstorm Sandy Victims Say FEMA's Role Is Fatally Conflicted

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Dallas insurance agent Jo Ann Charron has worked with clients to help clear confusion over subsidies offered by plans on the federal health insurance exchange. This sort of free guidance can save insurance shoppers time and money, agents say. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Texas Insurance Brokers Play Bigger Role In 2015's Obamacare

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Bridgeit Vaughn (left), of the billing office at Mid State Orthopaedic, meets with Gayle Jackson-Pryce to discuss the costs of Jackson-Pryce's upcoming shoulder surgery. Jenny Gold for NPR hide caption

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Jenny Gold for NPR

With Medical Debt Rising, Some Doctors Push For Payment Upfront

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America's Health Insurance Plans President and CEO Karen Ignagni says she would loosen regulations on which insurance plans comply with the Affordable Care Act by adding a "lower tier" option that could entice healthier people. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP