racism racism
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Scientists Start To Tease Out The Subtler Ways Racism Hurts Health

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The U.S. Air Force Academy has completed its investigation into an incident of racist graffiti on campus. The school's terrazzo and chapel are seen here in Colorado Springs, Colo., this summer. Jason Gutierrez/United States Air Force Academy hide caption

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Jason Gutierrez/United States Air Force Academy

Workers pull pipes from an oil well in 2016 near Crescent, Okla. The oil industry wants to attract a new, more diverse generation of workers, but a history of racism and sexism makes that difficult. J Pat Carter/Getty Images hide caption

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J Pat Carter/Getty Images

Big Oil Has A Diversity Problem

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Kolbi Brown (left), a program manager at Harlem Hospital in New York, helps Karen Phillips sign up to receive more information about the All of Us medical research program, during a block party outside the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

Troubling History In Medical Research Still Fresh For Black Americans

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U.S. Air Force Academy Superintendent Lt. Gen. Jay Silveria gathered cadets, staff and others to urge them to have moral courage and protect their institution from racism. A video of the speech was released by the school. U.S. Air Force Academy hide caption

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U.S. Air Force Academy

The Rev. Robert Wright Lee, a relative of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, resigned on Monday as pastor from a North Carolina church. Above, Lee speaks at the MTV Video Music Awards in August. Matt Sayles/Invision/AP hide caption

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Matt Sayles/Invision/AP

Francine Anderson grew up in a small town in Virginia in the 1950s. She says that when she was 5 years old, she first realized that the color of her skin could put her in danger. Courtesy of StoryCorps hide caption

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Courtesy of StoryCorps

After 60 Years, Girl's Experience At Whites-Only Gas Station Still Hurts

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While doctors and nurses have an ethical duty to treat all patients, they are not immune to feelings of dread when it comes to patients who are hateful or belligerent. A well-known article from the 1970s spoke to this. Sally Elford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sally Elford/Getty Images

Neo-Nazis and white supremacists who participated in the protests in Charlottesville, Va., are being identified online — and the family of one man says they no longer have anything to do with him. Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images

After racist graffiti was sprayed on the gate of his house in Los Angeles, the Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James spoke about racism, saying "Hate in America, especially for African-Americans, is living every day." Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

After Sulley Muntari (right) heard racial slurs from fans during a match in Sardinia, Italy, on April 30, he protested — and got a yellow card from the referee. A supporter holds the card aloft. Enrico Locci/Getty Images hide caption

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Enrico Locci/Getty Images

Calvin Hennick (right) attends a Red Sox game with his son, Nile, and his father-in-law, Guy Mont-Louis, at Boston's Fenway Park. Hennick reported a white fan who he said made a racist remark about a Kenyan woman who sang the national anthem. Courtesy of Calvin Hennick hide caption

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Courtesy of Calvin Hennick

The death rate for African-Americans dropped 25 percent over 17 years, but most of that was among people ages 65 and older. Dutchy/Getty Images hide caption

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Dutchy/Getty Images

Death Rate Among Black Americans Declines, Especially For Elderly People

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