Louisiana Louisiana

Republican presidential candidate John Kasich's campaign is running an online ad and sent out a fundraising plea in response to the Paris attacks. Kasich is shown here at a town hall campaign event. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

City Marshals Norris Greenhouse (left) and Derrick Stafford are seen in their booking photos provided by Louisiana State Police in New Orleans. They were arrested Friday on charges of killing a 6-year-old boy and critically wounding his father during a car chase. Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Reuters /Landov

Louisiana Democratic state Rep. John Bel Edwards walks past Republican U.S. Sen. David Vitter as they take their places before a gubernatorial debate. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Ronnie Landry, 14, plays basketball in front of his home on Schnell Drive. He and his father, Wilbert Landry, bottom right, moved here from the 9th Ward of New Orleans in 2014. Noney Deffes, bottom left, is a longtime Schnell Drive resident who survived the flood in a neighbor's attic, then lived out of her recreational vehicle before returning to her home. Edmund D. Fountain for NPR hide caption

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Edmund D. Fountain for NPR

The Survivors' Street: 10 Years Of Life After Katrina

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President George W. Bush (center) surveys the devastation in New Orleans with (from left to right) Vice Adm. Thad Allen, Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco, Mayor Ray Nagin and Lt. Gen. Russel Honore on Sept. 12, 2005, two weeks after Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

"Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job ..."

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Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina made landfall near Pearlington, Miss., a tiny town on the border with Louisiana. A home currently under construction there adheres to new FEMA standards for elevation. David Schaper/NPR hide caption

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David Schaper/NPR

From The Eye Of The Hurricane To Near Oblivion: Katrina's Forgotten Town

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Officials stand by the scene outside a movie theater where a man opened fire on filmgoers Thursday in Lafayette, La. At least two were fatally wounded and seven others injured before the gunman killed himself. Lee Celano/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Lee Celano/Reuters/Landov

More than 80 percent of the people getting federal subsidies to defray the cost of their monthly health insurance premiums have jobs, statistics suggest. And many are middle class. Jen Grantham/iStockphoto hide caption

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Jen Grantham/iStockphoto

Low, Middle Income Workers Most Vulnerable To Loss Of Obamacare Subsidies

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Sheron Bazille pays $219.01 a month for her health insurance. She knows the amount down to the penny. Jeff Cohen/WNPR hide caption

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Jeff Cohen/WNPR

Tales From 3 Louisianans Who Got Subsidized Health Insurance

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Carlton Scott pays $266.99 per month for his subsidized health insurance plan. He worries he and his neighbors would lose their insurance without the subsidy. Jeff Cohen/WNPR hide caption

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Jeff Cohen/WNPR

What's At Stake If Supreme Court Eliminates Your Obamacare Subsidy

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The annual Courir de Mardi Gras in Mamou, La., in February 2008. In the Cajun country tradition, revelers go house to house, collecting ingredients for gumbo from local families. Here, the host tosses a live chicken from a rooftop for the participants to catch — which can be tricky, considering the festivities often begin with early-morning drinking. Carol Guzy/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Carol Guzy/Washington Post/Getty Images

Melissa Downer and her family moved to Camp Minden, La., 11 years ago and live on three acres. The mother of three young daughters says they'll move if the M6 is burned in the open air. Kate Archer Kent/Red River Radio hide caption

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Kate Archer Kent/Red River Radio

EPA Push For Massive Munitions Burn Ignites Opposition In Louisiana

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