Louisiana Louisiana
Stories About

Louisiana

Louisiana crawfish caught in waters in and around Berlin are on display at Fisch Frank fish restaurant in Berlin. They are an invasive species and authorities recently licensed a local fisherman to catch them and sell them to local restaurants. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Carsten Koall/Getty Images

For Berlin, Invasive Crustaceans Are A Tough Catch And A Tough Sell

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/636504971/636603650" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Restaurant workers dole out chicken fricassee at the "Taste of EatLafayette" festival in the sprawling Cajundome arena in Lafayette, Louisiana. Locals say Bourdain captured the subtleties of their culture and cuisine, even if at times some thought he overemphasized alcohol. Daniella Cheslow hide caption

toggle caption
Daniella Cheslow

Robert Taylor, center, speaks at a St. John the Baptist Parish council meeting in 2017. He and the other members of the citizens' group around him wear T-shirts that reference the safety limit for the chemical chloroprene. Julie Dermansky hide caption

toggle caption
Julie Dermansky

After Decades Of Air Pollution, A Louisiana Town Rebels Against A Chemical Giant

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/583973428/591341722" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a case where a defense lawyer refused to follow the instructions of his client, who contended he was innocent. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Liam James Doyle/NPR

In Supreme Court, Skepticism Of Lawyer Who Overrode Client's Wish To Plead Not Guilty

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578479044/578555346" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The New Orleans Saints kneel before the playing of the national anthem before the game against the Green Bay Packers at Lambeau Field on Oct. 22. Dylan Buell/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dylan Buell/Getty Images

Louisiana Lawmaker Threatens Saints' Tax Breaks After Anthem Protests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/572683875/572989601" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Betsy's Pancake House on Canal Street in New Orleans announces its return to business after Hurricane Katrina. Ian McNulty hide caption

toggle caption
Ian McNulty

A boy fishes on a bayou near Isle de Jean Charles, La., in August 2015. Louisiana is still losing about a football field of coastline every hour. Lee Celano/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lee Celano/AFP/Getty Images

Frederick Bell of Larose, La., says he's received no guidance from a public defender on how to fight drug charges from October. Bell is part of a class action lawsuit against Louisiana's public defender board that charges the public defense system is unconstitutional. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Debbie Elliott/NPR

Public Defenders Hard To Come By In Louisiana

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/519211293/519703364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A neighborhood in the eastern part of New Orleans where a tornado touched down on Tuesday. Tornadoes destroyed homes and injured dozens of people in the city. Sean Gardner/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gardner/Getty Images

A new lawsuit alleges the public defender system for the the state of Louisiana has failed to provide effective representation to poor people. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Brandon/AP

Eshon Trosclair holds her son Camron Chapital on Tuesday after a tornado tore through while they were inside their home in the eastern part of New Orleans. The National Weather Service says at least three confirmed tornadoes touched down, including one inside the New Orleans city limits. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gerald Herbert/AP

Wetlands and marshlands that once protected New Orleans and the surrounding areas from storm surge have been depleted over the years. Here, the $1.1 billion Lake Borgne Surge Barrier outside New Orleans in 2015. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

To Fight Coastal Damage, Louisiana Parishes Pushed To Sue Energy Industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/511216472/511267296" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Richie Blink, born and raised in Plaquemines Parish, La., south of New Orleans, works for the National Wildlife Federation. He got in touch with an archaeologist to take a look at some shards of pottery that were eroding into the Gulf of Mexico. Blink holds a pottery shard that could be 300 to 500 years old, from the Plaquemine culture of what's called the Bayou Petre phase. Tegan Wendland/WWNO hide caption

toggle caption
Tegan Wendland/WWNO

Louisiana History Washes Away As Sea Levels Rise, Land Sinks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/505320391/508151270" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript