President Obama President Obama

President Obama speaks about immigration reform during a meeting with young immigrants in the White House on Feb. 4. The president's 2014 executive actions on immigration have been caught up in a legal dispute, which the White House has appealed to the Supreme Court. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Invited By Obama To 'Pop Off,' John McCain Just Did

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Former Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood in 2012. Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Would More Dinner And Golf Solve Washington's Problems? Ray LaHood Thinks So

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Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley take the stage after individually answering questions during Friday night's First In The South Democratic Presidential Forum at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, S.C. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Chuck Burton/AP

President Obama, flanked by Secretary of State John Kerry (right) and Vice President Joe Biden, announced the Keystone XL pipeline decision Friday in the Roosevelt Room of the White House. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Buddie, the mascot for the pro-marijuana legalization group ResponsibleOhio, waits on a sidewalk to greet passing college students during a promotional tour at Miami University of Ohio last month. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

President Obama told the International Association of Chiefs of Police Annual Conference in Chicago Tuesday that police should not be scapegoated for the failures of the justice system. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

U.S. Army soldiers walk as a NATO helicopter flies overhead at coalition force Forward Operating Base (FOB) Connelly in the Khogyani district in the eastern province of Nangarhar on August 13, 2015. Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images

How U.S. Troops Will Exit Afghanistan Remains Unclear

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President Obama salutes prior to boarding Air Force One last Friday. The president entered office saying he would end the U.S. role in the Iraq and Afghan wars. But U.S. forces were sent back to Iraq last year and he announced Thursday that 5,500 American troops would remain in Afghanistan beyond their previously planned departure at the end of 2016. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP