chicken chicken
Stories About

chicken

The Feed the Future Tworore Inkoko, Twunguke project hosts a meeting in the Gataraga sector of Rwanda to recruit farmers to grow chickens. If the farmers commit to four days of training and pass a competency test, they are given a backyard coop worth about $625, as well as the means to obtain 100 day-old chicks, vaccines, feed and technical advice. Emily Urban/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Urban/NPR

James Dinklage, a cattle rancher from Nebraska, is one of the plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed Thursday. The suit accuses the USDA of "arbitrary and capricious" behavior in rolling back two Obama-era rules designed to protect small farmers, who say they are being exploited by the meatpacking companies they supply. Courtesy Dinklage Family/Organization for Competitive Markets hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy Dinklage Family/Organization for Competitive Markets

Mueller plans to build his chicken barns in this cornfield just south of his home. His barns would house "breeders," the hens that lay the eggs that will hatch to be raised for meat. Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

Chicken meat for sale at a market in Anhui province, China. VCG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
VCG via Getty Images

Chinese Chicken Is Headed To America, But It's Really All About The Beef

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/528139468/528198393" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Poultry workers at major U.S. meat-processing plants are highly susceptible to repetitive-motion injuries, denied bathroom breaks and are most often immigrants and refugees. Earl Dotter/Oxfam hide caption

toggle caption
Earl Dotter/Oxfam

This chick will live. It's female. Jessica Harms/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Harms/Getty Images

Technology May Rescue Male Baby Chicks From The Grinder

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499613622/499796219" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The modern broiler, or meat chicken, grows incredibly fast. But some critics say the bird — and the flavor of its meat — may suffer as a result. Whole Foods wants all of its suppliers to shift to slower-growing chicken breeds, like this one, seen at Arkansas-based Crystal Lake Farms. Courtesy of Crystal Lake Farms hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Crystal Lake Farms

Why Whole Foods Wants A Slower-Growing Chicken

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472167748/472365317" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The USDA has found salmonella on about a quarter of all cut-up chicken parts heading for supermarket shelves. It's a good reason to handle raw chicken carefully, wash your hands afterward, and cook the meat well. Sandor Weisz/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Sandor Weisz/Flickr

USDA Imposes Stricter Limit On Salmonella Bacteria In Poultry Products

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/465530128/465530129" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A chicken house in Seagrove, N.C. North Carolina is one of the country's largest poultry producers. As farms move closer to residential areas, neighbors are complaining that the waste generated is a potential health hazard. Kelly Bennett/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kelly Bennett/MCT via Getty Images

When A Chicken Farm Moves Next Door, Odor May Not Be The Only Problem

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463976110/464219458" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lee Perry-Gal measures chicken long bones at the zooarchaeology lab, Zinman Institute of Archaeology, University of Haifa. Courtesy of Guy Bar-Oz hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Guy Bar-Oz

The Ancient City Where People Decided To Eat Chickens

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/424707879/424722531" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tyson Foods says it has already reduced its use of human-use antibiotics by 80 percent over the past four years. Here, Tyson frozen chicken on display at Piazza's market in Palo Alto, Calif., in 2010. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Sakuma/AP

Tyson Foods To Stop Giving Chickens Antibiotics Used By Humans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/402736017/402736018" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chickens stand in their cages at a farm near Stuart, Iowa, in 2009. This week, bird flu hit a large poultry facility in Iowa. It's not clear how the virus is evading the industry's biosecurity efforts. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charlie Neibergall/AP

Millions Of Chickens To Be Killed As Bird Flu Outbreak Puzzles Industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401319019/401319023" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The annual Courir de Mardi Gras in Mamou, La., in February 2008. In the Cajun country tradition, revelers go house to house, collecting ingredients for gumbo from local families. Here, the host tosses a live chicken from a rooftop for the participants to catch — which can be tricky, considering the festivities often begin with early-morning drinking. Carol Guzy/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Carol Guzy/Washington Post/Getty Images

About a quarter of the chicken parts we buy are tainted with salmonella, according to USDA tests. snowpea&bokchoi/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
snowpea&bokchoi/Flickr

Clean Up Those Contaminated Chicken Parts, USDA Tells Industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/378844287/378905671" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A poultry processing plant in France. Europe banned treating chicken carcasses with chlorine in the 1990s out of fear that it could cause cancer. Christophe Di Pascale/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption
Christophe Di Pascale/Corbis

European Activists Say They Don't Want Any U.S. 'Chlorine Chicken'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/351774240/352661430" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript