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Some personal injury law firms now automatically target online ads at anyone who enters a nearby hospital's emergency room and has a cellphone. The ads may show up on multiple devices for more than a month. sshepard/Getty Images hide caption

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sshepard/Getty Images

Digital Ambulance Chasers? Law Firms Send Ads To Patients' Phones Inside ERs

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Phillip Waterman/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Radio Replay: This Is Your Brain On Ads

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Phillip Waterman/Getty Images/Cultura RF

This Is Your Brain On Ads: How Media Companies Hijack Your Attention

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Ads for tech companies like Apple and Netflix dominate billboards on Sunset Boulevard in Los Angeles. Linda Wang/NPR hide caption

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Linda Wang/NPR

On LA's Sunset Strip, A New Golden Age Of Billboards

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Otto Steininger/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Our Mental Space, Under Attack

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Advertisements paid for by tobacco companies say their products are deadly and were manipulated to be more addictive. Tobacco Free Kids hide caption

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Tobacco Free Kids

In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive

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Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., (left) and Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., holds a news conference Oct. 19 to introduce legislation designed to increase the transparency of political ads on Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Facebook's Advertising Tools Complicate Efforts To Stop Russian Interference

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A recent test by dermatologists found that 83 percent of the top-selling moisturizers that are labeled "hypoallergenic"contained a potentially allergenic chemical. Jill Ferry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jill Ferry/Getty Images

'Hypoallergenic' And 'Fragrance-Free' Moisturizer Claims Are Often False

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YouTube has changed the way it pays video creators. One says his earnings have recently "taken a huge nose dive." Danny Moloshok/AP hide caption

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Danny Moloshok/AP

Online Video Producers Caught In Struggle Between Advertisers And YouTube

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In Pepsi's new ad, model Kendall Jenner joins a protest march and hands a soda to a police officer. Following a widespread backlash, the company announced on Wednesday that it would halt a wider rollout of the video. Pepsi/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Pepsi/Screenshot by NPR

After Uproar, Pepsi Halts Rollout Of Controversial Protest-Themed Ad

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Boxes of Kellogg's Frosted Flakes cereal are seen at a store in Arlington, Va. Kellogg's is facing a boycott organized by Breitbart after the cereal giant decided to pull its advertising from the right-wing website. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

For Advertisers, Fake Eyeballs May Be Bigger Problem Than Fake News

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