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Advertisements paid for by tobacco companies say their products are deadly and were manipulated to be more addictive. Tobacco Free Kids hide caption

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Tobacco Free Kids

In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive

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Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., (left) and Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., holds a news conference Oct. 19 to introduce legislation designed to increase the transparency of political ads on Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Facebook's Advertising Tools Complicate Efforts To Stop Russian Interference

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A recent test by dermatologists found that 83 percent of the top-selling moisturizers that are labeled "hypoallergenic"contained a potentially allergenic chemical. Jill Ferry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jill Ferry/Getty Images

'Hypoallergenic' And 'Fragrance-Free' Moisturizer Claims Are Often False

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YouTube has changed the way it pays video creators. One says his earnings have recently "taken a huge nose dive." Danny Moloshok/AP hide caption

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Danny Moloshok/AP

Online Video Producers Caught In Struggle Between Advertisers And YouTube

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In Pepsi's new ad, model Kendall Jenner joins a protest march and hands a soda to a police officer. Following a widespread backlash, the company announced on Wednesday that it would halt a wider rollout of the video. Pepsi/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Pepsi/Screenshot by NPR

After Uproar, Pepsi Halts Rollout Of Controversial Protest-Themed Ad

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Boxes of Kellogg's Frosted Flakes cereal are seen at a store in Arlington, Va. Kellogg's is facing a boycott organized by Breitbart after the cereal giant decided to pull its advertising from the right-wing website. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

For Advertisers, Fake Eyeballs May Be Bigger Problem Than Fake News

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The start of flu season is still weeks or months away, but you can get a flu shot now at many pharmacies. "It's a way to get people into the store to buy other things," says Tom Charland, an analyst who tracks the walk-in clinic industry. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Jonathan Goldsmith plays "The Most Interesting Man in the World" in beer company Dos Equis' ad campaign. Bobby Quillard/Anderson Group Public Relations hide caption

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Bobby Quillard/Anderson Group Public Relations

Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson's campaign has been a fast-adopter of targeting people on Facebook. He has more than 4 million likes on the social media site, more than any other candidate. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Like It Or Not, Political Campaigns Are Using Facebook To Target You

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Ohio Gov. John Kasich's supporters have spent more on TV ads than any other presidential candidate, despite a late entry into the race. New Day For America/YouTube hide caption

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New Day For America/YouTube

In Turnabout, Candidates With Less Spend More, Candidates With More Spend Less

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