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U.S. lawmakers will question lobbyists and officials from Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple on an array of issues. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

'Facebook Is Dangerous': Firms In Hot Seat As Congress Probes Big Tech

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Kate Klonick, assistant professor of law at St. John's University, gave her students an optional assignment for spring break: Try to identify a stranger based solely on what they reveal in public. Above, strangers commuting in London. Classen Rafael / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Classen Rafael / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Googling Strangers: One Professor's Lesson On Privacy In Public Spaces

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Most of us ignore the fine print. But one woman who didn't earned herself $10,000. Others have found themselves on the losing end of a contract they didn't bother to read. Sofie Delauw/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Sofie Delauw/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the F8 Facebook Developers conference on May 1, 2018, in San Jose, Calif. He is pledging more enhanced privacy and other features when it comes to private messages. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Facebook has been paying young users as young as 13 years old up to $20 a month to install an app called Facebook Research, TechCrunch reported. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook, Google Draw Scrutiny Over Apps That Collected Data From Teens

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An Apple executive talks about group FaceTime during an announcement of new products at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in June. Apple says it has disabled group FaceTime after a bug was revealed letting callers eavesdrop on recipients before they accepted a call. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the annual F8 conference in San Jose, Calif., on May 1. California passed legislation that would allow users to sue for damages for data breaches like the one Facebook recently suffered. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Why The Tech Industry Wants Federal Control Over Data Privacy Laws

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Ashok Kumar distributes government food rations to customer Leela Devi at his shop near Ramgarh, in India's Jharkhand state. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

India's Biometric ID System Has Led To Starvation For Some Poor, Advocates Say

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A passenger looks over planes sitting on the tarmac at LaGuardia Airport in New York City on Nov. 22. A previously undisclosed TSA program flags passengers for observation, and undercover air marshals observe their behavior — including whether they make calls or send texts as they travel, The Boston Globe reports. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Some personal injury law firms now automatically target online ads at anyone who enters a nearby hospital's emergency room and has a cellphone. The ads may show up on multiple devices for more than a month. sshepard/Getty Images hide caption

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sshepard/Getty Images

Digital Ambulance Chasers? Law Firms Send Ads To Patients' Phones Inside ERs

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An unidentified man walks in front of the Microsoft logo at an event in New Delhi. Microsoft is at the center of a Supreme Court case on whether it has to turn over emails stored overseas. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

Court Seems Unconvinced Of Microsoft's Argument To Shield Email Data Stored Overseas

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The U.S. Supreme Court confronts the digital age again on Wednesday. At issue is whether police have to get a search warrant in order to obtain cellphone location information that is routinely collected and stored by wireless providers. Georgijevic/Getty Images hide caption

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Georgijevic/Getty Images

Amazon's Cloud Cam is part of the Amazon Key in-home delivery system, rolling out on Wednesday. Amazon hide caption

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Amazon

As Amazon Looks To Unlock Your Door, Taking Stock Of Meaning Of Privacy

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Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, announces features of the new iPhone X on Sept. 12 at the Steve Jobs Theater on the new Apple campus in Cupertino, Calif. The phone's new ability to unlock itself using a scan of its owner's face inspired a strong, divided reaction. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

iPhone X's Face ID Inspires Privacy Worries — But Convenience May Trump Them

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Patient information can be vulnerable when health care facilities are the focus of cyberattacks. Eric Audras/Onoky/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Audras/Onoky/Getty Images

Hospitals Face Growing Cybersecurity Threats

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Both chambers of the U.S. Congress have voted to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's privacy rules for Internet service providers. Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images

Companies And Users Can Do More To Stay Secure With Smart Devices

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