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An iPhone user attends a rally at the Apple flagship store in Manhattan on Tuesday to support the company's refusal to help the FBI access an encrypted iPhone. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Marc Rotenberg, head of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, opposes phones that would have a built-in backdoor. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

A Privacy Advocate's View Of Ordering Apple To Help Unlock Shooter's iPhone

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FBI Director James Comey is one of the federal officials who has said that the growing use of encryption hurts the ability to track criminals. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Keith Srakocic/AP

President Obama speaks at the White House Summit on Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection at Stanford University on Feb. 13. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Charlize, 8, plays with the Kidizoom Multimedia Digital Camera made by VTech in 2009. A recent data breach hacking sensitive information, including kid's photos, is prompting parents to look twice at their children's technology usage. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/Getty Images

At School And At Home, How Much Does The Internet Know About Kids?

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CIA Director John Brennan made this case against encryption on Monday at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

After Paris Attacks, Encrypted Communication Is Back In Spotlight

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Luma is a new Wi-Fi manager that turns a parent's smartphone into an Internet remote control. Luma hide caption

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Luma

As Kids Go Online, New Tools For Parents To Spy

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California Gov. Jerry Brown signs one of the hundreds of bills on Friday, among them a new law that is contains the most stringent digital privacy protections in the country. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Carol and John Iovine say the health coach their insurer assigned John after he had a torrent of grave health problems in 2014 has helped them get the medical care he still needs. And it's helped keep him out of the hospital. Todd Bookman/WHYY hide caption

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Todd Bookman/WHYY

Insurer Uses Personal Data To Predict Who Will Get Sick

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Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks in New York on April 30. This week, he said some of Silicon Valley's most prominent companies have "built their businesses by lulling their customers into complacency about their personal information." Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Apple's Cook Takes Rivals To Task Over Data Privacy

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License plate scanners have helped police locate stolen vehicles and have even assisted in murder investigations. But with their ability to track a person's every move, skeptics worry about privacy. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Questions Remain About How To Use Data From License Plate Scanners

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High-definition video cameras with 30x magnification keep watch over the Boston Marathon finish line, where two bombs detonated in 2013, killing three people and injuring hundreds. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Boston Marathon Surveillance Raises Privacy Concerns Long After Bombing

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