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Carol and John Iovine say the health coach their insurer assigned John after he had a torrent of grave health problems in 2014 has helped them get the medical care he still needs. And it's helped keep him out of the hospital. Todd Bookman/WHYY hide caption

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Todd Bookman/WHYY

Insurer Uses Personal Data To Predict Who Will Get Sick

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Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks in New York on April 30. This week, he said some of Silicon Valley's most prominent companies have "built their businesses by lulling their customers into complacency about their personal information." Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Apple's Cook Takes Rivals To Task Over Data Privacy

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License plate scanners have helped police locate stolen vehicles and have even assisted in murder investigations. But with their ability to track a person's every move, skeptics worry about privacy. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Questions Remain About How To Use Data From License Plate Scanners

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High-definition video cameras with 30x magnification keep watch over the Boston Marathon finish line, where two bombs detonated in 2013, killing three people and injuring hundreds. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Boston Marathon Surveillance Raises Privacy Concerns Long After Bombing

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Jonathan Zittrain, co-founder of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, says the right to be forgotten online is "a very bad solution to a real problem." Samuel Lahoz/Intelligence Squared U.S. hide caption

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Samuel Lahoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Should The U.S. Adopt The 'Right To Be Forgotten' Online?

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The University of Oregon is under fire from students and some employees for turning a student's mental-health records over to its lawyers. Rick Obst/Flickr hide caption

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Rick Obst/Flickr

College Rape Case Shows A Key Limit To Medical Privacy Law

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A staff member from DJI Technology Co. demonstrates a drone in Shenzhen, in southern China's Guangdong province. A new website lets people request that drones stay away from their property. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Now You Can Sign Up To Keep Drones Away From Your Property

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks to students at Sequoia High School in Redwood City, Calif. His company released a new, simpler privacy policy Thursday, but it does not make any big changes to how much data the company collects from users. Alex Washburn/AP hide caption

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Alex Washburn/AP

From her cubicle at Vital Decisions in Cherry Hill, N.J., Kate Schleicher counsels people who are seriously ill. Emma Lee/WHYY hide caption

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Emma Lee/WHYY

Hello, May I Help You Plan Your Final Months?

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