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oil spill

The wake of a supply vessel heading toward a working platform crosses over an oil sheen drifting from the site of the former Taylor Energy oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico in 2015. The Coast Guard says it has contained the oil spill. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Australian officials say an environmental disaster is unfolding in the Solomon Islands after a ship ran aground and began leaking oil next to a UNESCO World Heritage site. The Australian High Commission Solomon Islands/AP hide caption

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The Australian High Commission Solomon Islands/AP

Cleanup workers rake oil-soaked hay along a Santa Barbara beach in 1969, after an oil spill that was then the largest in U.S. history. Bettmann/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann/Getty Images

How California's Worst Oil Spill Turned Beaches Black And The Nation Green

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An aerial view Monday reveals one of the oil slicks on the surface of the East China Sea, reminders of the deadly explosion that sank an Iranian tanker. The spill continues to grow. Liu Shiping/Xinhua via AP hide caption

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Liu Shiping/Xinhua via AP

The Zirlott family's oyster farm is at the end of a long pier in Sandy Bay. Legend has it that the name "Murder Point" comes from a deadly dispute over an oyster lease at this site back in 1929. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

7 Years After BP Oil Spill, Oyster Farming Takes Hold In South

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In its prime, the Hero sailed through frigid temperatures and ice-strewn waters in the South Pole. But now it's sinking, leaking oil and threatening Washington's oysters. Molly Solomon/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Molly Solomon/Oregon Public Broadcasting

The Flame Refluxer is essentially a big copper blanket: think Brillo pad of wool sandwiched between mesh. Using it while burning off oil yields less air pollution and residue that harms marine life. Courtesy of Worcester Polytechnic Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Researchers Test Hotter, Faster And Cleaner Way To Fight Oil Spills

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Crews work to clean up an oil spill on the North Saskatchewan River on Friday. Husky Energy has said between 200,000 and 250,000 liters of crude oil and other material leaked into the river on Thursday from its pipeline. Jason Franson/The Canadian Press via AP hide caption

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Jason Franson/The Canadian Press via AP

Louisiana is in line for the biggest share of fines and settlements because it had the most damage in the spill. The restoration effort in the Caminada Headlands is one of the largest coastal restoration projects ever in the state. CWPPRA/Flickr hide caption

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CWPPRA/Flickr

Is The BP Oil Spill Settlement Money Being Well-Spent?

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Oil trains sit idle on the BNSF Railway's tracks in Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood. David Schaper/NPR hide caption

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David Schaper/NPR

Battle Over New Oil Train Standards Pits Safety Against Cost

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A bird covered in oil flaps its wings at Refugio State Beach, north of Goleta, Calif., on Thursday. More than 9,000 gallons of oil have been raked, skimmed and vacuumed from a spill that stretched across 9 miles of California coast, just a fraction of the sticky, stinking goo that escaped from a broken pipeline, officials said. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP