Human Rights Human Rights
Stories About

Human Rights

The European Court of Justice in Luxembourg, seen here in 2015, ruled Thursday that psychological tests of sexual orientation may not be used to rule on asylum applications. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

Thailand's fishing industry remains the home of widespread labor and rights abuses, Human Rights Watch says. In this photo from 2016, a fisherman is seen in the freezer hold of a boat unloading fish after arriving at a Thai port. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

Myanmar's civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi gives a speech this month in Beijing. The U.N. human rights chief says she could be held responsible for her country's brutal treatment of the Rohingya. Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images

Zimbabwean Pastor Evan Mawarire, acquitted recently of trying to subvert the government, has deftly used social media in a quest for justice and rights. "It's important that we let the administration that is coming in right now know that if they do to us what Robert Mugabe's government did to us, we will do the same thing to them that we've done to Robert Mugabe," he recently told journalists. Mujahid Safodien/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mujahid Safodien/AFP/Getty Images

'Fight For Rights Will Continue' In Zimbabwe, #ThisFlag Movement Pastor Vows

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569757806/569767179" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump joined Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People on Nov. 9 in Beijing. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pool/Getty Images

In China, Trump Helped Basketball Stars But Not Human Rights

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564970718/565025426" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Newly arrived Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar walk to a camp for refugees in Teknaf, Bangladesh, on Monday. Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees have streamed across the border following Myanmarese military retaliation for attacks by a Rohingya militant group. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

Rohingya Refugees Pour Into Bangladesh, And Many Question A Militant Group's Actions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/555022829/556041286" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In a photo provided Saturday by the Shenyang Municipal Information Office, Liu Xia, center, the widow of Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, holds a portrait of him during his funeral. She stands with Liu Hui, her younger brother (left) and Liu Xiaoxuan, the younger brother of her late husband, who is holding his cremated remains. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

A volunteer brings daily food rations for people who fled the conflict in the Kasai region earlier this month. They are at a camp for internally displaced persons in Kikwit, Democratic Republic of Congo. John Wessels /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Wessels /AFP/Getty Images

Two gay men, who do not want to be identified for safety reasons, left Chechnya after being kidnapped and beaten there. Gregory (left) says he was held for 12 days in a basement. Arnie (right) says he was disowned by his relatives after he was delivered back to his family unconscious, in a burlap bag. They spoke with NPR at a safe house in Moscow. Natalie Winston/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Natalie Winston/NPR

'They Told Me I Wasn't A Human Being': Gay Men Speak Of Brutal Treatment In Chechnya

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/532977587/533100079" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Waad was one of the opposition groups that participated in a Sept. 2013 demonstration. Before a court ordered it to dissolve today, it was the only major opposition group still operating in the country. Hasan Jamali/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Hasan Jamali/AP

A Huajian shoe factory, which has been investigated by labor activists, makes Ivanka Trump-branded shoes, among others, in China. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

China Detains Activist Investigating Factory Making Ivanka Trump Shoes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/530290213/530891511" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">