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Joseph Blackman, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, at work in Miami. Mosquitoes infected with Zika are now spreading the illness in at least four different parts of the city, according to federal health officials. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Zika May Be In The U.S. To Stay

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Divided States: 4 Florida Voters Weigh In After The Final Presidential Debate

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People bike on the beach ahead of Hurricane Matthew in Atlantic Beach, Fla., on Wednesday. Droves of people in the U.S. have begun evacuating coastal areas ahead of the storm, which tracked a deadly path through the Caribbean in a maelstrom of wind, mud and water. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

A Florida Department of Health employee processes a urine sample to test for the Zika virus on Sept. 14 in Miami Beach. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Reporter's Notebook: Pregnant And Caught In Zika Test Limbo

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A resident checks on damage from Hurricane Hermine in Cedar Key, Fla. Hermine was downgraded to a tropical storm after it made landfall. Authorities say the storm could regain hurricane status by the time it hits the Mid-Atlantic states by Monday. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

A satellite image shows Tropical Storm Hermine forming in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday. The storm is expected to make landfall north of Tampa late Thursday night or early Friday morning, the National Hurricane Center says. NASA/NOAA GOES Project hide caption

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NASA/NOAA GOES Project

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (from left), Sen. Marco Rubio and Sen. John McCain. Gaston De Cardenas/AFP/Getty Images; Joe Raedle/Getty Images; Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston De Cardenas/AFP/Getty Images; Joe Raedle/Getty Images; Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Lenroy Watt talks with residents of Miami's Little Haiti about Zika, leaving brochures in Creole about how to prevent the illness, as well as phone numbers for local mosquito control agencies and the county health department. Courtesy of Planned Parenthood hide caption

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Courtesy of Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood Joins Campaign To Rid Miami Neighborhoods Of Zika

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Tropical Storm Colin brought big waves to Fort Myers Beach in Fort Myers, Fla., in early June. Given the threat of serious flooding, Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in the area. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Climate Change Complicates Predictions Of Damage From Big Surf

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