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A voter marks a ballot for the New Hampshire primary Feb. 9 inside a voting booth at a polling place in Manchester, N.H. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Independent Voters In Colorado, Florida And Arizona

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Frank Mazzotti, a professor of wildlife biology and researcher with the Everglades environmental restoration team, has been studying alligators in the national park for more than a decade. Amy Green/WMFE hide caption

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Amy Green/WMFE

Honey, Who Shrank The Alligators?

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Stephen Jenner, from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, sprays an insecticide under an avocado tree where some Oriental fruit flies were found on September 9, 2015 in Homestead, Fla. After months fighting a fruit fly infestation, Florida has declared the insect has been eradicated. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Sporadic dengue fever outbreaks in Florida in 2009 and 2010 spurred mosquito control efforts in Key West and Miami Beach, shown here. The same mosquito that carries dengue, Aedes aegypti, can transmit Zika. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida Governor Ramps Up Mosquito Fight To Stay Ahead Of Zika

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The Florida Supreme Court in Tallahassee, shown here in 2007, must decide whether executions can move ahead as planned. Jon V/Flickr hide caption

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Jon V/Flickr

Florida Supreme Court To Decide Whether Executions Can Go Forward

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Researchers from the University of South Florida found some of the remains of 55 people in a graveyard at the Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. USF Anthropology Team/AP hide caption

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USF Anthropology Team/AP

Princess Pageant crowns reflect the importance of patchwork, beadwork, and Seminole symbols. Will O'Leary hide caption

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Will O'Leary

A Princess In Patchwork: Sewing For The Miss Florida Seminole Princess Pageant

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Marco Garcia/AP

Ex-Felons Fight To Restore Their Right To Vote

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A botanist walks through the Pine Flatwoods of Big Cypress Preserve in December 2012. The preserve is home to several oil wells, but a proposed seismic study — being fought by environmentalists — could dramatically increase exploration. Tim Chapman/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Tim Chapman/MCT/Landov

Environmentalists Sound Alarm On Proposed Drilling Near Florida Everglades

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"Osceola" stands in front of a crowd at the FSU homecoming game. Eileen Soler/Seminole Tribune hide caption

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Eileen Soler/Seminole Tribune

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

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Oranges ripen in a grove in Plant City, Fla. Citrus greening, a disease spread by a tiny insect that ruins oranges and eventually kills the trees, has put the future of the state's $10 billion citrus industry in doubt. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

How Long Can Florida's Citrus Industry Survive?

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Mike Owen, park biologist at Fakahatchee Strand Preserve in Florida, documents an orchid growing on a cypress tree. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Scientists Work With Cuba To Bring Lost Orchids Back To Florida State Park

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A woman walks in front of a business with the municipal flag painted on the entrance doors in Lares, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 2, 2015. Puerto Rico's economy has been struggling, and Puerto Ricans living on the U.S. mainland, who can vote, vow to be heard this election in an effort to help the ailing U.S. territory. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AP

Puerto Ricans Vow To Have A Bigger Voice In 2016 Election

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