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Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (from left), Sen. Marco Rubio and Sen. John McCain. Gaston De Cardenas/AFP/Getty Images; Joe Raedle/Getty Images; Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston De Cardenas/AFP/Getty Images; Joe Raedle/Getty Images; Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Lenroy Watt talks with residents of Miami's Little Haiti about Zika, leaving brochures in Creole about how to prevent the illness, as well as phone numbers for local mosquito control agencies and the county health department. Courtesy of Planned Parenthood hide caption

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Courtesy of Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood Joins Campaign To Rid Miami Neighborhoods Of Zika

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Tropical Storm Colin brought big waves to Fort Myers Beach in Fort Myers, Fla., in early June. Given the threat of serious flooding, Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in the area. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Climate Change Complicates Predictions Of Damage From Big Surf

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A plane sprays pesticide over the Wynwood neighborhood of Miami on Aug. 6. That's just one way health officials are battling back Zika-carrying mosquitoes in the area. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How Big, Really, Is The Zika Outbreak In Florida?

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Chris Green, a tribal member, and his son get the dogs out early to round up a herd at Big Cypress Reservation. Carlton Ward Jr/National Geographic Creative hide caption

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Carlton Ward Jr/National Geographic Creative

South Florida's Seminole Cowboys: Cattle Is 'In Our DNA'

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Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., and Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., seen here in 2012, are both facing competitive elections in 2016. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

How To Lose The Senate In 82 Days

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Vanessa Gomez (left) with her son Ezra, 2, and her friend Cristy Fernandez with her 9-month-old-son River, in the Wynwood neighborhood of Miami. At least 14 people likely caught Zika from mosquitoes in the neighborhood, health officials say. Gomez calls that news "scary," but adds, "we cannot stop living our lives." Marta Lavandier/AP hide caption

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Marta Lavandier/AP

With Zika in Miami, What Should Pregnant Women Across The U.S. Do?

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Surgeon General Vivek Murthy looks at a sample of mosquitoes in Orlando, Fla., on Monday. With him is Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell and Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

A Broward County, Fla., employee takes water samples in a yard to test for mosquito larvae in June. It's part of the county's mosquito control program. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Democratic candidates visited the Central Florida Democratic Hispanic Caucus Voting Festival and Mock Election, which took place in Kissimmee, Fla. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Which Way Florida Goes Hinges On Puerto Rican Voters

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The blue-green algae is called cyanobacteria. It can release toxins that affect the liver and nervous system. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

'A Government-Sponsored Disaster': Florida Asks For Federal Help With Toxic Algae

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