Florida Florida

Employees of Key Fisheries, a Marathon, Fla. fish market that was damaged by Hurricane Irma, clean up debris. Their business is closed to the public due to all the damage done by the storm. Frank Morris/NPR hide caption

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Frank Morris/NPR

Battered By Irma, Florida Fishermen Pin Their Hopes On Stone Crab Season

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Mothers helping other mothers through the challenges of postpartum depression and anxiety makes Florida's mentoring program unique. Veronica Grech/Getty Images hide caption

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Veronica Grech/Getty Images

Nancy and Christian Schneider live in the Holly Lake Mobile Home park, where they haven't had electricity in their home since Hurricane Irma struck Florida over a week ago. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Evacuees at a special needs shelter sit and chat or rest, Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017, at Florida International University in Miami, Fla. About 30 people, including staff with the Florida Keys Outreach Coalition for the Homeless from Key West, Fla., were sheltered in a storefront underneath a parking garage on campus. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Miami Hurricane Shelter Still Packed - With People And Pets

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Flor Garcia talks to a guest at the Comfort Inn in Fort Myers, Fla. The hotel has become a second home for local residents who find themselves evacuating there during hurricanes. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

When Hurricanes Churn, A Little Hotel Becomes Something More

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Fallen fruit sits on the ground below orange trees in Frostproof, Fla., U.S. Hurricane Irma destroyed almost half of the citrus crop in some areas. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

People crowd Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport as evacuation is underway on Thursday. Michele Eve Sandberg/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Eve Sandberg/AFP/Getty Images

With A Hurricane Approaching Florida, Airline Algorithms Show No Sympathy

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