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This GOES-16 GeoColor satellite image taken on May 26, at 21:30 UTC, and provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), shows Subtropical Storm Alberto in the the Gulf of Mexico. The slow-moving system made landfall on Monday in the Florida Panhandle. NOAA via AP hide caption

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NOAA via AP

Alberto is predicted to move over the Tennessee Valley on Tuesday, weakening further as it heads toward the Ohio Valley and Great Lakes region. NOAA/NWS, Esri, HERE, Garmin, Earthstar Geographics hide caption

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NOAA/NWS, Esri, HERE, Garmin, Earthstar Geographics

This graphic, created by the NWS/NCEP Weather Prediction Center, shows rainfall potential for Subtropical Storm Alberto. National Hurricane Center/NOAA hide caption

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National Hurricane Center/NOAA

A man in an NRA hat (who didn't want to give his name) speaks at a March For Our Lives event on March 24 in West Palm Beach, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Gov. Rick Scott, R-Fla., is expected to announce his challenge to Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., on Monday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Republican Florida Governor Jumps Into Senate Race, Shaking Up 2018 Map

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Law enforcement officers block off the entrance to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 15 in Parkland, Fla. A day earlier a gunman opened fire in the school, killing 17 people. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

In Florida, Cities Challenge State On Gun Regulation Laws

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Surviving Mass Shootings Draws 2 Floridians Together

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Florida Gov. Rick Scott signs the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Public Safety Act on Friday. The legislation includes a number of gun restrictions and also permits school personnel who are not full-time teachers to be armed. Mark Wallheiser/AP hide caption

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Mark Wallheiser/AP

Flamingos at Jungle Island, a zoological theme park, in Miami in 2017. The long-legged pink birds were once common in Florida. But their striking feathers were prized decorations for ladies' hats, and they were thought to have been hunted out of existence for the plume trade in the 1800s. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida's Long-Lost Wild Flamingos Were Hiding In Plain Sight

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Onlookers offer support Wednesday at a crosswalk as students arrive for their first classes at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School since a massacre there two weeks ago killed 17 people. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Fane Lozman will make his second appearance before the Supreme Court. This time he has sued the city of Riviera Beach for his arrest at a City Council meeting where he refused to stop talking about government corruption. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

The Curious Case Of A Florida Man Who Called Politicians Corrupt, Got Thrown In Jail

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