Children's Health : Shots - Health News Children's Health

A 4-year-old Honduran girl carries a doll while walking with her immigrant mother. Both were released Sunday from federal detention in McAllen, Texas. Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images

Separating Kids From Their Parents Can Lead To Long-Term Health Problems

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Border Patrol agents take a father and son from Honduras into custody near the U.S.-Mexico border. The asylum seekers were then sent to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing center for possible separation. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

A Pediatrician Reports Back From A Visit To A Children's Shelter Near The Border

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Stephanie and Natalie enrolled their older son in sessions at a Brain Balance Achievement Center in the hope that it would help him make friends. Hokyoung Kim for NPR hide caption

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Hokyoung Kim for NPR

'Cutting Edge' Program For Children With Autism And ADHD Rests On Razor-Thin Evidence

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Velva Poole works to reunite children with parents who have been grappling with substance use disorder. Mentoring the parents, she says, is a big part of the state-sponsored program's success. Lisa Gillespie/Louisville Public Media hide caption

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Lisa Gillespie/Louisville Public Media

Opioid Treatment Program Helps Keep Families Together

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Jessica Morris prepares to inject a blood-clotting protein into son Landon's arm at their home in Yuba City, Calif. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Miracle Of Hemophilia Drugs Comes At A Steep Price

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Marbell Castillo held her granddaughter, Maia Powell, as she was being examined by nurse practitioner Molly Lalonde at Burke Pediatrics in Burke, Va., in October 2017. Maia is insured through Virginia's Children's Health Insurance Program. Matt McClain/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt McClain/The Washington Post/Getty Images

After Months In Limbo For Children's Health Insurance, Huge Relief Over Deal

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Ariel Haughton's children Rose (left), 4, and Javier, 2, are covered by CHIP. Haughton is upset that lawmakers have left CHIP in flux for her two children and millions of kids around the country. Courtesy of Ariel Haughton hide caption

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Courtesy of Ariel Haughton

Dr. Scott Gottlieb, Food and Drug Administration commissioner, told Kaiser Health News the incentives intended to spur development of drugs for rare diseases deserve a fresh look. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

About 180,000 babies develop hydrocephalus each year in sub-Saharan Africa. Baby Faridah received treatment for the deadly condition this year at the CURE Children's Hospital of Uganda in Mbale, Uganda. Christopher Mullen, CURE International hide caption

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Christopher Mullen, CURE International

About one child a month dies from being entangled in cords from blinds and shades, a study finds. Efforts are underway to get corded blinds off the market, but many will remain in homes. Joanne Dugan/Getty Images hide caption

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Joanne Dugan/Getty Images

Alejandra Borunda, sits with her two children, Natalia, 11, and Raul, 8, holding the family dog at their home in Aurora, Colo. Borunda's children are among those who would lose out if the CHIP program isn't funded. Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images

States Sound Warning That Kids' Health Insurance Is At Risk

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Yaritza Martinez holds her son, Yariel, during a visit to Children's National Health System in Washington D.C. She was infected with the Zika virus while pregnant, but Yariel seems to be doing fine. Selena Simmons-Duffin/WAMU hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/WAMU

A Baby Exposed To Zika Virus Is Doing Well, One Year Later

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

Alexa, Are You Safe For My Kids?

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