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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

Alexa, Are You Safe For My Kids?

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An 11-year-old boy put small magnets up both nostrils, then couldn't figure out how to get them out. These X-rays tell the tale. The New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

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The New England Journal of Medicine

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, center, and ranking member Ron Wyden, D-Ore., have a plan to renew funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program, which lapsed Sept. 30. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Dr. Kurt Newman visits with 14-year-old Jack Pessaud, who's undergoing treatment for a cancerous tumor in his knee at Children's National Health System in Washington, D.C. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

'Healing Children': A Surgeon's Take On What Kids Need

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As a child, Rachael Goldring had multiple open-heart surgeries to treat her congenital heart disease. At 24, she still sees pediatricians because she has had difficulty finding the right care in adult medicine. Kerry Klein/KVPR hide caption

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Kerry Klein/KVPR

Survivors Of Childhood Diseases Struggle To Find Care As Adults

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Twenty percent of baby food samples were found to contain lead, according to a report from the Environmental Defense Fund. The report did not name brand names. Wiktory/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Wiktory/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Dawn Poole and her husband have to regularly document their family finances to make sure their nine children, who all have complex health conditions, continue to qualify for Medicaid. Courtesy of the Poole family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Poole family

New Jersey has been distributing baby boxes — cardboard containers that double as cribs or bassinets — to new parents since January. Maisha Watson is currently living in a motel outside Atlantic City, N.J., with her infant son, Solomon Murphy. With no room for a crib, Solomon sleeps in the baby box. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Davis/NPR

As Popularity Of Baby Boxes Grows, Skeptics Say More Testing Is Needed

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