Children's Health : Shots - Health News Children's Health

When Georgia Moore (second from left) was diagnosed with leukemia in 2010, her parents, Trevor and Courtney Moore, worried about the germs her younger sister, Ivy, would bring home from school. Courtesy of the Moore family/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Courtesy of the Moore family/Kaiser Health News

He's more likely to get a timeout than a spanking. narvikk/Getty Images hide caption

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narvikk/Getty Images

Spanking Young Children Declines Overall But Persists In Poorer Households

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Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Poverty Wages For U.S. Child Care Workers May Be Behind High Turnover

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Teen Night Owls Struggle To Learn And Control Emotions At School

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Premature birth is the leading cause of infant death in the U.S. and also can cause lifelong disabilities. Anthony Saffery/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Saffery/Getty Images
Scott Bakal for NPR

Would You Want To Know The Secrets Hidden In Your Baby's Genes?

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Auvi-Q was pulled from the market in 2015 because of quality concerns. The drug's maker says the problems have been solved and that the product will be available in 2017. AP hide caption

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AP

This happens, pediatricians acknowledge. So they're offering advice on how to reduce the risk of bed sharing with infants, which includes removing loose bedding that could lead to suffocation. PhotoAlto/Anne-Sophie Bost/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Anne-Sophie Bost/Getty Images

Pediatricians realize parents need strategies beyond "Put down that phone!" Jiangang Wang/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Jiangang Wang/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

No Snapchat In The Bedroom? An Online Tool To Manage Kids' Media Use

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