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Most parents have a favorite child, psychologists say, even if they try to be fair. Hero Images Inc./Corbis hide caption

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Hero Images Inc./Corbis

When Kids Think Parents Play Favorites, It Can Spell Trouble

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People who practice free-range parenting say it makes kids more independent, but others see it as neglect. State and local laws don't specify what children are allowed to do on their own. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Kids' Solo Playtime Unleashes 'Free-Range' Parenting Debate

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A health worker with Doctors Without Borders carries a child suspected of having Ebola at the treatment center in Paynesville, Liberia, last October. Ebola is especially deadly for young children and babies. About 4 in 5 infected died. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

The Grandpa Who Saved His Granddaughter From Ebola

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The ParaGuard IUD, which releases copper into the uterine cavity, can last up to 10 years. In clinical studies, the pregnancy rate among women using the device was less than 1 pregnancy per 100 women annually. Mark Harmel/Science Source hide caption

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Mark Harmel/Science Source

Mary Harris was relieved when Stella was born with a mop of thick black hair, as if she had been protected from the chemo somehow. Courtesy of Howard Harris hide caption

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Courtesy of Howard Harris

Pregnant With Cancer: One Woman's Journey

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The number of children who need glasses has risen quickly across East Asia and Southeast Asia. But some parents and doctors in China are skeptical of lenses. They think glasses weaken children's vision. Imaginechina/Corbis hide caption

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Imaginechina/Corbis

Why Is Nearsightedness Skyrocketing Among Chinese Youth?

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Chef David Iott explains the perfect way to prepare risotto to Stanford students. Courtesy of Stanford's Residential and Dining Enterprises hide caption

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Courtesy of Stanford's Residential and Dining Enterprises
KQED

A Boy Who Had Cancer Faces Measles Risk From The Unvaccinated

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Emily Neblett, a patient at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital in Nashville, Tenn., demonstrates circuit pieces from the mobile maker space that are connected by magnets. Noah Nelson/Youth Radio hide caption

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Noah Nelson/Youth Radio

'Maker Space' Allows Kids To Innovate, Learn In The Hospital

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Research into how the human brain develops helps explain why teens have trouble controlling impulses. Leigh Wells/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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Leigh Wells/Ikon Images/Corbis

Why Teens Are Impulsive, Addiction-Prone And Should Protect Their Brains

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Rhett Krawitt, 6, outside his school in Tiburon, Calif. Seven percent of the children in his school are not vaccinated. Courtesy of Carl Krawitt hide caption

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Courtesy of Carl Krawitt
Will Crocker/Getty Images

Child Abuse And Neglect Laws Aren't Being Enforced, Report Finds

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