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A child runs a shopping cart relay during an Education Department summer enrichment event, "Let's Read, Let's Move." The 2012 event was part of a summer initiative to engage youths in summer reading and physical activity, and provide them information about healthy, affordable food. Many efforts underway are aimed at getting people to think anew about their daily habits. Chris Maddaloni/CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Maddaloni/CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images

There's a growing body of evidence challenging the notion that low-fat dairy is best. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Full-Fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

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The FDA says tortillas and other foods made with corn masa flour can now be fortified with folic acid. The move is aimed at reducing severe brain and spinal cord defects in babies born to Hispanic women. Verónica Zaragovia for NPR hide caption

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Verónica Zaragovia for NPR

Jena Lopez with her daughters Sophie, left, and Nora. Research suggests that parental support is the key to good mental health in children who transition. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Parent Support May Help Transgender Children's Mental Health

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Natalie Wilson/Flickr State/Getty Images

'Girls & Sex' And The Importance Of Talking To Young Women About Pleasure

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Hector Moreno checks a basement for lead paint in Baltimore. He is an environmental assessor with Green and Healthy Homes. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

Baltimore Struggles To Protect Children From Lead Paint

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Students eat breakfast at the Blueberry Harvest School at Harrington Elementary School in Harrington, Maine. Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Signs warn not to drink the lead-contaminated water from a water fountain in Flint, Mich. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

America's 'Lead Wars' Go Beyond Flint, Mich.: 'It's Now Really Everywhere'

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