Children's Health : Shots - Health News Children's Health

The World Health Organization has endorsed waiting to clamp the umbilical cord for at least one minute after a baby is born. Sebastien Desarmaux/Godong/Science Source hide caption

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Sebastien Desarmaux/Godong/Science Source

Kids in Cape Town socialize as they walk to school. Children in South Africa often don't get to play outside by themselves because of the high rate of violent crimes in some areas. Henk Badenhorst/Getty Images hide caption

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Henk Badenhorst/Getty Images
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Concussions Can Be More Likely In Practices Than In Games

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A group of mothers and infants celebrate a recent graduation from the Harlem Children's Zone Baby College program. Marty Lipp/Courtesy of Harlem Children's Zone hide caption

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Marty Lipp/Courtesy of Harlem Children's Zone

Boosting Education For Babies And Their Parents

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Back in 2012, Silver Diner — a fast-casual restaurant chain in Maryland and Virginia — completely overhauled its children's menu. Those changes helped dramatically improve the healthfulness of kids' meals ordered, a new study finds. Ron Cogswell/Flickr hide caption

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Ron Cogswell/Flickr

The number of women buying, selling and sharing breast milk is growing rapidly. But it can be a risky purchase, scientists say, because a mom can't tell by looking at the milk whether it's safe and nutritious for her baby. iStockphoto hide caption

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Breast Milk Sold Online Contaminated With Cow's Milk

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Frito-Lay reformulated Flamin' Hot Cheetos, a perennial favorite among school kids, to meet new federal "Smart Snack" rules for schools. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Guess What Makes The Cut As A 'Smart Snack' In Schools? Hot Cheetos

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