Children's Health : Shots - Health News Children's Health

None of the biocontainment treatment centers in U.S. hospitals were specifically designed for kids — until now. Texas Children's Hospital aims to fill that gap. Courtesy of Texas Children's Hospital hide caption

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Courtesy of Texas Children's Hospital

Kids With Ebola, Bird Flu Or TB? Texas Children's Hospital Will Be Ready

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The purple-stained Rothia dentocariosa bacteria are frequently found in the human mouth and respiratory tract. CDC hide caption

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CDC

Missing Microbes Provide Clues About Asthma Risk

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Residents of Flint, Mich. (shown here in January), have been protesting the quality and cost of the city's tap water for more than a year. Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

High Lead Levels In Michigan Kids After City Switches Water Source

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Longer lines in the cafeteria and shorter lunch periods mean many public school students get just 15 minutes to eat. Yet researchers say when kids get less than 20 minutes for lunch, they eat less of everything on their tray. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto
David Williams/Illustration Works/Corbis

How Best To Teach A Troubled Teen? The Question Can Get Stuck In Court

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People who don't get enough sleep show higher levels of inflammation, say scientists who study colds. Smoking, chronic stress and lack of exercise can make you more susceptible to the viruses, too. Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Corbis hide caption

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Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Corbis

Sleep More, Sneeze Less: Increased Slumber Helps Prevent Colds

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