Pharmaceuticals : Shots - Health News Pharmaceuticals

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar talked Friday about the administration's plans to lower drug prices as President Trump looked on in the White House Rose Garden. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Maryland's overturned law restricted the price of generic drugs, and had been hailed as a model for other states. It's one of a number of state initiatives designed to combat rapidly rising drug prices. Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images

When patients connect online, they often share information that reveals how treatments work in the real world. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images
stevecoleimages/Getty Images

Probe Into Generic Drug Price Fixing Set To Widen

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/590217561/591423244" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jessica Morris prepares to inject a blood-clotting protein into son Landon's arm at their home in Yuba City, Calif. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Miracle Of Hemophilia Drugs Comes At A Steep Price

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/589469361/590974657" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Little, Brown and Company

Long-Term Effects Of Psychotropic Drugs Are 'Cloaked In Mystery'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/589081018/589238184" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Ronald Cirillo helps Deborah Hatfield fill out paperwork at a Florida clinic, before running a test to see whether she has hepatitis C. Daylina Miller/Health News Florida hide caption

toggle caption
Daylina Miller/Health News Florida

From Retirement To The Front Lines Of Hepatitis C Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567750728/575168322" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Scott Gottlieb, Food and Drug Administration commissioner, told Kaiser Health News the incentives intended to spur development of drugs for rare diseases deserve a fresh look. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

With drug prices in the election spotlight, the pharmaceutical industry's main trade group raised its revenue and spending. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PeopleImages/Getty Images

Peter Saltonstall, president of the National Organization of Rare Disorders, speaks at a rally Tuesday in support of tax credits for companies that develop drugs for rare diseases. Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN

Jared Haley, general manager of the C-Axis plant in Caguas, Puerto Rico, says computer-operated milling machines like this one can cost more than a half-million dollars. Heat and humidity in the plant after Hurricane Maria left many of the machines inoperable, Haley says. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico's Medical Manufacturers Worry Federal Tax Plan Could Kill Storm Recovery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/566771228/566808704" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, center, and other lawmakers have a plan to overhaul the tax code that includes a provision that would repeal a tax credit for makers of drugs for rare diseases. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Republican Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa and Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota want drugmakers to stop wasting money by making eyedrops that are too big. Douglas Graham/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Douglas Graham/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images

Gregory Matthews has glaucoma and uses prescription eyedrops. The dropper's opening creates a bigger drop than he needs, causing him to run out of his medication before the prescription is ready to refill. Matt Roth for ProPublica hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Roth for ProPublica

Drug Companies Make Eyedrops Too Big, And You Pay For The Waste

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/558358137/558706881" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Drug lobbyists and consumer health advocates fill the halls of the state Capitol in September to see how Assembly members vote on a controversial drug price transparency bill. Tam Ma/Courtesy of Health Access California hide caption

toggle caption
Tam Ma/Courtesy of Health Access California

California Bill Would Compel Drugmakers To Justify Price Hikes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/551013546/555710534" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hepatitis C virus, via transmission electron microscopy. (The actual viral diameter is around 22 nm.) Doctors say the recent FDA approval of Mavyret, a less expensive drug for treating the virus, may make it easier for more insurers and correctional facilities to expand treatment. James Cavallini/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
James Cavallini/Science Source