Cancer : Shots - Health News Cancer

Dr. Vinay Prasad is 35 and an assistant professor of medicine at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, where he researches health policy, the high cost of drugs and evidence-based medicine. He has more than 21,000 followers on Twitter. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Tweeting Oncologist Draws Ire And Admiration For Calling Out Hype

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A genetic test could spare many women with a common form of breast cancer from receiving chemotherapy. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Doctors Scrutinize Overtreatment, As Cancer Death Rates Decline

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A team at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore is developing a tumor-detecting algorithm for detecting pancreatic cancer. But first, they have to train computers to distinguish between organs. Courtesy of The Felix Project hide caption

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Courtesy of The Felix Project

For Some Hard-To-Find Tumors, Doctors See Promise In Artificial Intelligence

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Herceptin has proved to be effective in prolonging the lives of the 12 percent of women with breast cancer whose malignancy hasn't spread to other organs, and whose cancer is HER2-positive. But side effects can be a problem. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

A group of people with connections to two cities in North Carolina and Alabama have been diagnosed with a rare eye cancer called ocular melanoma. Medical experts are trying to determine the cause of the cases. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

When patients connect online, they often share information that reveals how treatments work in the real world. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Michael Robertson in his home on in Washington, D.C. Years ago, he didn't feel well and chalked it up to work stress. It was much more serious than that. Kelly Jo Smart for NPR hide caption

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Kelly Jo Smart for NPR

The 30-Year Quest To Tame The 'Wily' Cancer Gene

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Shaorong Deng gets an experimental treatment for cancer of the esophagus that uses his own immune system cells. They have been genetically modified with the gene-editing technique known as CRISPR. Yuhan Xu/NPR hide caption

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Yuhan Xu/NPR

Doctors In China Lead Race To Treat Cancer By Editing Genes

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A Stage-4 Cancer Patient Shares The Pain And Clarity Of Living 'Scan-To-Scan'

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Everything Happens for a Reason by Kate Bowler Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

What Not To Say To The Terminally Ill: 'Everything Happens For A Reason'

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Kate Murphy felt frustrated by a lack of advice from doctors on how to use medical marijuana to mitigate side effects from her cancer treatment. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR
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Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect Cancers

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Ben and Tara Stern relax at home in Essex, Md. Ben was diagnosed with glioblastoma in 2016. After conventional treatment failed to stop the tumor, Ben tried an experimental drug. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

For Now, Sequencing Cancer Tumors Holds More Promise Than Proof

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Ariel Haughton's children Rose (left), 4, and Javier, 2, are covered by CHIP. Haughton is upset that lawmakers have left CHIP in flux for her two children and millions of kids around the country. Courtesy of Ariel Haughton hide caption

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Courtesy of Ariel Haughton
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Gene Therapy Shows Promise For A Growing List Of Diseases

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Advertisements paid for by tobacco companies say their products are deadly and were manipulated to be more addictive. Tobacco Free Kids hide caption

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Tobacco Free Kids

In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive

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Many people who live in the Blue Gap-Tachee Chapter in northeastern Arizona remember when mining companies blasted uranium out of the Claim 28 site near their homes. Dust from mine explosions coated everything. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

For Some Native Americans, Uranium Contamination Feels Like Discrimination

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