Cancer : Shots - Health News Cancer

Shaorong Deng gets an experimental treatment for cancer of the esophagus that uses his own immune system cells. They have been genetically modified with the gene-editing technique known as CRISPR. Yuhan Xu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Yuhan Xu/NPR

Doctors In China Lead Race To Treat Cancer By Editing Genes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/585336506/587502704" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Stage-4 Cancer Patient Shares The Pain And Clarity Of Living 'Scan-To-Scan'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/585066841/585142351" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Everything Happens for a Reason by Kate Bowler Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Bogle/NPR

What Not To Say To The Terminally Ill: 'Everything Happens For A Reason'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/583774624/584181911" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kate Murphy felt frustrated by a lack of advice from doctors on how to use medical marijuana to mitigate side effects from her cancer treatment. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR
Andrew Lichtenstein/Getty Images

Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect Cancers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578620342/578957021" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ben and Tara Stern relax at home in Essex, Md. Ben was diagnosed with glioblastoma in 2016. After conventional treatment failed to stop the tumor, Ben tried an experimental drug. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

For Now, Sequencing Cancer Tumors Holds More Promise Than Proof

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/572940706/578083266" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ariel Haughton's children Rose (left), 4, and Javier, 2, are covered by CHIP. Haughton is upset that lawmakers have left CHIP in flux for her two children and millions of kids around the country. Courtesy of Ariel Haughton hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Ariel Haughton
Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Gene Therapy Shows Promise For A Growing List Of Diseases

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/565728869/567155749" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Advertisements paid for by tobacco companies say their products are deadly and were manipulated to be more addictive. Tobacco Free Kids hide caption

toggle caption
Tobacco Free Kids

In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/566014966/566808710" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Many people who live in the Blue Gap-Tachee Chapter in northeastern Arizona remember when mining companies blasted uranium out of the Claim 28 site near their homes. Dust from mine explosions coated everything. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

toggle caption
Laurel Morales/KJZZ

For Some Native Americans, Uranium Contamination Feels Like Discrimination

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/562856213/564163490" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of cultured cancer cells from a human cervix, showing numerous blebs (lumps) and microvilli (hair-like structures) characteristic of cancer cells. Cancer of the cervix (the neck of the uterus) is one of the most common cancers affecting women. Magnification: x3000 when printed 10 centimetres wide. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Gschmeissner/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

If you are suddenly unable to work for an extended period because of illness, injury or accident, long-term-disability insurance can save the day. Rich LaSalle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rich LaSalle/Getty Images

Lori Wallace says it's frustrating to constantly hear messages in ads for hospitals that imply her cancer would go away if she were just more positive and tried harder. Sam Harnett/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Sam Harnett/KQED

The Painful Side Of Positive Health Care Marketing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/555370189/564443911" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Testing for changes in cells of the cervix or for presence of the HPV virus are both good ways to screen for cervical cancer, health organizations say. GARO/Canopy/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
GARO/Canopy/Getty Images

A study of chemotherapy medicines produced by 10 companies found that, on average, each drug produced seven times as much revenue for its manufacturer as it cost in research and development. BrianAJackson/iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
BrianAJackson/iStockphoto/Getty Images

R&D Costs For Cancer Drugs Are Likely Much Less Than Industry Claims, Study Finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/550135932/550218516" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center had 528 patients in the hospital as Harvey hit. A team of about 1,000 people tended to them and their families until reinforcements arrived Monday. Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center

An 'Army Of People' Helps Houston Cancer Patients Get Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547539504/547774628" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. R. Michael Tuttle, an endocrinologist at New York's Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, talks with Debonis about an ultrasound of the thyroid tumor. Courtesy of Memorial Sloan Kettering hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Memorial Sloan Kettering

Scientists have created a treatment in which genetically modified T cells, shown in blue, can attack cancer cells, shown in red. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

FDA Approves First Gene Therapy For Leukemia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547293551/547373424" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A California jury awarded a woman $417 million in a case against Johnson & Johnson. The woman claimed that her use of Johnson's Baby Powder led to terminal ovarian cancer. Scientists disagree on how strong a link there is between talc and ovarian cancer. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Does Baby Powder Cause Cancer? A Jury Says Yes. Scientists Aren't So Sure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545314093/545314096" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and other female senators were excluded from the Senate leadership health task force this summer. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Andrew Ladd and Fumiko Chino at their wedding in 2006, after his cancer diagnosis. Ladd died the following year, leaving behind hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical debt. Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino

Widowed Early, A Cancer Doctor Writes About The Harm Of Medical Debt

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542589232/542663782" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript