Cancer : Shots - Health News Cancer

Screening for lung cancer can catch tumors but it can also produce false positives. Patients need to decide whether it's right for them, but doctors often don't know how to advise them. FS Productions/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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FS Productions/Getty Images/Blend Images

Patient Aaron Reid receives (CAR) T-cell therapy at the NIH in Bethesda, MD. The process took five minutes to complete. Pearl Mak/NPR hide caption

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Pearl Mak/NPR

Scientists Race To Improve 'Living Drugs' To Fight Cancer

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An early prototype of the silicon-chip-sized particle accelerator that physicists at Stanford are working on. Eventually, miniature accelerators might have a role in radiating tumors, the scientists say. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory hide caption

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Physicists Go Small: Let's Put A Particle Accelerator On A Chip

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Some critically ill patients who received a CAR-T cell treatment have remained cancer-free for as long as five years, researchers say. But the price is high. Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images

According to MarketWatch, Johnson & Johnson "has been fighting more than 9,000 talcum-powder lawsuits with mixed success. It says its signature powder has always been safe and asbestos-free." Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

"Our health care systems need to adjust a little to try to get knowledge about cancer prevention to everybody," says Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society. American Cancer Society hide caption

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American Cancer Society

"If my life were to end next week ... I want to feel like I have made a contribution," said Carol Martin, seen here holding her 2018 Boston Marathon medal. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Dr. Vinay Prasad is 35 and an assistant professor of medicine at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, where he researches health policy, the high cost of drugs and evidence-based medicine. He has more than 21,000 followers on Twitter. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Tweeting Oncologist Draws Ire And Admiration For Calling Out Hype

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A genetic test could spare many women with a common form of breast cancer from receiving chemotherapy. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Doctors Scrutinize Overtreatment, As Cancer Death Rates Decline

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A team at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore is developing a tumor-detecting algorithm for detecting pancreatic cancer. But first, they have to train computers to distinguish between organs. Courtesy of The Felix Project hide caption

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Courtesy of The Felix Project

For Some Hard-To-Find Tumors, Doctors See Promise In Artificial Intelligence

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Herceptin has proved to be effective in prolonging the lives of the 12 percent of women with breast cancer whose malignancy hasn't spread to other organs, and whose cancer is HER2-positive. But side effects can be a problem. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

A group of people with connections to two cities in North Carolina and Alabama have been diagnosed with a rare eye cancer called ocular melanoma. Medical experts are trying to determine the cause of the cases. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

When patients connect online, they often share information that reveals how treatments work in the real world. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Michael Robertson in his home on in Washington, D.C. Years ago, he didn't feel well and chalked it up to work stress. It was much more serious than that. Kelly Jo Smart for NPR hide caption

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Kelly Jo Smart for NPR

The 30-Year Quest To Tame The 'Wily' Cancer Gene

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Shaorong Deng gets an experimental treatment for cancer of the esophagus that uses his own immune system cells. They have been genetically modified with the gene-editing technique known as CRISPR. Yuhan Xu/NPR hide caption

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Yuhan Xu/NPR

Doctors In China Lead Race To Treat Cancer By Editing Genes

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A Stage-4 Cancer Patient Shares The Pain And Clarity Of Living 'Scan-To-Scan'

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Everything Happens for a Reason by Kate Bowler Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

What Not To Say To The Terminally Ill: 'Everything Happens For A Reason'

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