Cancer : Shots - Health News Cancer

Last May, members of the Avaaz civic organization dressed as crop-sprayers in Brussels to protest the European Commission's plans to re-license glyphosate, the popular weed-killer sold by Monsanto under the brand name Roundup. John Thys/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Thys/AFP/Getty Images

Cancer patient John Krahne has delayed taking a prescribed cancer drug because it was too expensive. He walks near his home in Santa Rosa, Calif. Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News

Sometimes fast-acting chemotherapy can help slow an aggressive cancer — and give the slower-acting immunotherapies a chance to work. UIG Platinum/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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UIG Platinum/UIG via Getty Images

Old-Style Chemo Is Still A Mainstay In The Age Of Targeted Cancer Therapy

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Nancy Roach at a conference in 2016. She's long worked as a patient's advocate and recently teamed up with scientists to help improve the design of studies, as well as to improve clinical care. Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer hide caption

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Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer

Advice From Patients On A Study's Design Makes For Better Science

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Generic drugs used for other conditions are being given a second look as cancer treatments. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

A Pinworm Medication Is Being Tested As A Potential Anti-Cancer Drug

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Research with living systems is never simple, scientists say, so there are many possible sources of variation in any experiment, ranging from the animals and cells to the details of lab technique. Tom Werner/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Werner/Getty Images

What Does It Mean When Cancer Findings Can't Be Reproduced?

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Patients always have the right to appeal an insurer's decision to turn down their request for care at a major cancer center. But the chances an appeal will be honored can vary widely by type of cancer and an individual's case. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Results from different genetic tests on samples from the same cancer patient can disagree about the best course of treatment. Clare McLean/University of Washington School of Medicine hide caption

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Clare McLean/University of Washington School of Medicine

The HPV vaccine has reduced the prevalence of the cancer-causing human papillomavirus by as much as 65 percent among those who are vaccinated. Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Advice For Doctors Talking To Parents About HPV Vaccine: Make It Brief

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Big Data Coming In Faster Than Biomedical Researchers Can Process It

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