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The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center had 528 patients in the hospital as Harvey hit. A team of about 1,000 people tended to them and their families until reinforcements arrived Monday. Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center hide caption

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Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center

An 'Army Of People' Helps Houston Cancer Patients Get Treatment

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Dr. R. Michael Tuttle, an endocrinologist at New York's Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, talks with Debonis about an ultrasound of the thyroid tumor. Courtesy of Memorial Sloan Kettering hide caption

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Courtesy of Memorial Sloan Kettering

Scientists have created a treatment in which genetically modified T cells, shown in blue, can attack cancer cells, shown in red. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

FDA Approves First Gene Therapy For Leukemia

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A California jury awarded a woman $417 million in a case against Johnson & Johnson. The woman claimed that her use of Johnson's Baby Powder led to terminal ovarian cancer. Scientists disagree on how strong a link there is between talc and ovarian cancer. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Does Baby Powder Cause Cancer? A Jury Says Yes. Scientists Aren't So Sure

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U.S. Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and other female senators were excluded from the Senate leadership health task force this summer. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Andrew Ladd and Fumiko Chino at their wedding in 2006, after his cancer diagnosis. Ladd died the following year, leaving behind hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical debt. Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino hide caption

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Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino

Widowed Early, A Cancer Doctor Writes About The Harm Of Medical Debt

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The only radiotherapy machine in Senegal is no longer working. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

Facing Cancer Is Even Tougher If The Only Radiation Machine Is Broken

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Music therapist Brian Schreck began working with Nate Kramer after he was diagnosed with leukemia. Together, they recorded a song of Nate's heartbeat layered over melodies. Courtesy of Brian Schreck hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Schreck

Heartbeat Music: Parents Remember Their Son Through His Song Of Life

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Jill Wiseman answers questions for the Contact Center based at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Robert Hood/Fred Hutch News Service hide caption

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Robert Hood/Fred Hutch News Service

Dad called these "his and hers chairs." He would sit beside Mom, his partner and wife of 34 years, as they got their weekly chemotherapy treatments. Howie Borowick had just been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and wife Laurel was in treatment for breast cancer for the third time. For him, it was new and unknown. For her, it was business as usual, another appointment on her calendar. Nancy Borowick hide caption

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Nancy Borowick

Our Last Year Together: What My Camera Captured As My Parents Died Of Cancer

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Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore opened a six-bed urgent care center next to its infusion center a couple of years ago. Of the patients who land there, about 80 percent are discharged home afterward, rather than needing admission to the hospital. Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine
Angie Wang for NPR

Listen to Anne Webster read her poem

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Amianthus, a variety of asbestos. Exposure to the fibers can cause mesothelioma, a cancer of the thin membranes that line the chest and abdomen. DEA Picture Library/Getty Images/DeAgostini hide caption

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DEA Picture Library/Getty Images/DeAgostini
Mick Wiggins/Ikon Images/Getty Images

How Flawed Science Is Undermining Good Medicine

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