Vaccines : Shots - Health News Vaccines

A vaccine given during pregnancy protects the baby against whooping cough, but only about 50 percent of pregnant women get it. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Pregnant Women: Avoid Soft Cheeses, But Do Get These Shots

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Cost, procrastination and a lack of insurance coverage are just a few of the reasons adults give health care providers for not getting vaccinated against shingles and other illnesses. Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Simone Groper got her flu shot in January at a Walgreens pharmacy in San Francisco. Flu season will likely last a few more weeks, health officials say, and immunization can still minimize your chances of getting seriously sick. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The body's under a lot of stress during a bout of flu, doctors say. Inflammation is up and oxygen levels and blood pressure can drop. These changes can lead to an increased risk of forming blood clots in the vessels that serve the heart. laflor/Getty Images hide caption

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laflor/Getty Images

Flu Virus Can Trigger A Heart Attack

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Flu patient Donnie Cardenas waits in an emergency room hallway with roommate Torrey Jewett at the Palomar Medical Center in Escondido, Calif., this past week. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Flu Season Is Shaping Up To Be A Nasty One, CDC Says

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The microneedle patches developed at Georgia Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Drug Delivery each contain an array of needles less than a millimeter long. Courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology hide caption

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Courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

Nurses give the oral polio vaccine to a Syrian child in a refugee camp in Turkey. The oral polio vaccine used throughout most of the developing world contains a form of the virus that has been weakened in the laboratory. But it's still a live virus. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images

Heading someplace where you could get traveler's diarrhea? Try packing some prophylactic pills containing bismuth subsalicylate, such as Pepto Bismol. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Tips For Staying Healthy When Traveling Abroad

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Vials of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine are displayed on a counter at a Walgreens Pharmacy in 2015 in Mill Valley, California. Photo illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

U.S. authorities are working on an emergency deal to import the yellow fever vaccine Stamaril, which is not currently licensed in the U.S. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Dr. Thumbi Mwangi, an infectious disease epidemiologist from Kenya, at Howard Theatre in Washington, DC, on Nov. 29, 2016. In the U.S., Mwangi worked on a vaccine for cows that aimed to combat the same disease he saw the bovine battle in Kenya as a kid. Akash Ghai/for NPR hide caption

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Akash Ghai/for NPR

A baby receives the rotavirus vaccine during a clinical trial in Niger. The new vaccine is the first designed specifically for children in sub-Saharan Africa. It doesn't require refrigeration and will be cheaper than ones currently available. Krishan Cheyenne/MSF hide caption

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Krishan Cheyenne/MSF

Andie Vaught grasps a stress toy in the shape of a truck as she prepares to have blood drawn as part of a clinical trial for a Zika vaccine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., in November 2016. Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York, Tuesday, after meeting with President-elect Donald Trump. Kennedy said Trump put him in charge of a commission on "vaccine safety." Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

The mumps virus is on the loose. Cases are popping up in Arkansas, Iowa and Illinois. Alissa Eckert/CDC hide caption

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Alissa Eckert/CDC

Mumps Bump: Cases Rise In Iowa, Illinois And Arkansas

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