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A medical worker holds a measles-rubella vaccine at a health station in Banda Aceh, Indonesia. Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP/Getty Images

At least 36 students at a North Carolina school have become infected with chickenpox. The school has many students whose parents claimed a religious exemption from state vaccination requirements. Milos Bataveljic/Getty Images hide caption

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Milos Bataveljic/Getty Images

A nurse vaccinates a baby against rotavirus, a deadly form of diarrhea. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Merck Pulls Out Of Agreement To Supply Life-Saving Vaccine To Millions Of Kids

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Charlie Hinderliter got a bad case of the flu back in January. He spent 58 days in the hospital, underwent two surgeries and was in a medically induced coma for a week. Neeta Satam for NPR hide caption

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Neeta Satam for NPR

Last Year, The Flu Put Him In A Coma. This Year He's Getting The Shot

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This did not really happen. Cows' heads did not emerge from the bodies of people newly inoculated against smallpox. But fear of the vaccine was so widespread that it prompted British satirist James Gillray to create this spoof in 1802. Institute of the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University hide caption

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Institute of the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

China's leaders have vowed to impose stiff penalties on drug companies who break the law, after a large vaccine company was found to have faked its records. Here, a child receives a vaccination shot at a hospital in China's southern Guangxi region on Monday. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

A vaccine given during pregnancy protects the baby against whooping cough, but only about 50 percent of pregnant women get it. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Pregnant Women: Avoid Soft Cheeses, But Do Get These Shots

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Cost, procrastination and a lack of insurance coverage are just a few of the reasons adults give health care providers for not getting vaccinated against shingles and other illnesses. Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Simone Groper got her flu shot in January at a Walgreens pharmacy in San Francisco. Flu season will likely last a few more weeks, health officials say, and immunization can still minimize your chances of getting seriously sick. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The body's under a lot of stress during a bout of flu, doctors say. Inflammation is up and oxygen levels and blood pressure can drop. These changes can lead to an increased risk of forming blood clots in the vessels that serve the heart. laflor/Getty Images hide caption

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laflor/Getty Images

Flu Virus Can Trigger A Heart Attack

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Flu patient Donnie Cardenas waits in an emergency room hallway with roommate Torrey Jewett at the Palomar Medical Center in Escondido, Calif., this past week. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Flu Season Is Shaping Up To Be A Nasty One, CDC Says

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The microneedle patches developed at Georgia Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Drug Delivery each contain an array of needles less than a millimeter long. Courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology hide caption

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Courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology