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Boys show off their four-legged friends at a rabies vaccination drive set up by the Serengeti Health Initiative in the Bariadi District of Tanzania. Anna Czupryna/Courtesy of Serengeti Health Initiative hide caption

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Anna Czupryna/Courtesy of Serengeti Health Initiative

Daniela Chavarriaga holds her daughter Emma as Dr. Jose Rosa-Olivares administers a measles vaccination at Miami Children's Hospital. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Vaccine Controversies Are As Social As They Are Medical

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Helen Down holds her 14-month-old daughter, Amelia, for an MMR shot in Swansea, Wales, April 2013. The vaccination was in response to a measles outbreak. Geoff Caddick/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Geoff Caddick/AFP/Getty Images

Marqui Ducarme is aided by his wife after catching chikungunya at his home in Port-au-Prince, May 23. The virus swept through Haiti this spring, infecting more than 40,000 people. Marie Arago/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Marie Arago/Reuters/Landov

Red blood cells infected with the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. Plasmodium is the parasite that triggers malaria in people. Gary D. Gaugler/Science Source hide caption

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Gary D. Gaugler/Science Source

Experimental Malaria Vaccine Blocks The Bad Guy's Exit

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A doctor gives a polio vaccine to a child at a health clinic in Baghdad last week. The CIA says it banned the use of vaccine programs as cover for spying last year — a practice health officials said had wide repercussions. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

False-color transmission electron micrograph of a field of whooping cough bacteria, Bordetella pertussis. A. Barry Dowsett/Science Source hide caption

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A. Barry Dowsett/Science Source

Family Tree Of Pertussis Traced, Could Lead To Better Vaccine

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There today, here tomorrow: A mother holds her child for a measles vaccination in Manila, Philippines, in January. Travelers are bringing measles from the Philippines to the United States. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

This one's virus-free: Matthew Followill, Nathan Followill and Caleb Followill of Kings of Leon performed in Los Angeles in December. Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Radio.com hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Radio.com