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Dr. Margaret Hamburg will have served almost six years as FDA commissioner by the time she leaves, far longer than the recent tenure for chiefs of the agency. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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J. David Ake/AP

FDA Commissioner Hamburg Grappled With Global Challenges

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Joe Kiani, addresses the second-annual Patient Safety, Science & Technology Summit in January 2014. Courtesy of the Patient Safety Movement Foundation hide caption

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Courtesy of the Patient Safety Movement Foundation

Proton beam therapy can precisely target tumors to avoid harming surrounding tissue, advocates say. Blythe Bernhard/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Blythe Bernhard/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/MCT/Landov

The MD Brush has an unusual grip that automatically angles the brush head at 45 degrees. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Build A Toothbrush, Change The World. Or Not

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The company Proteus has developed a computer that attaches to a pill and tracks the pill's absorption into the body. The technology has passed clinical trials. iStock hide caption

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iStock

Someday Soon You May Swallow A Computer With Your Pill

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Andreas Fhager, a biomedical engineer at the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, adjusts the Strokefinder device on a test subject's head. Gunilla Brocker hide caption

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Gunilla Brocker

Ed Damiano and his son David, 15, play basketball at home in Acton, Mass. Ed has invented a device he hopes will make David's diabetes easier to manage. Ellen Webber for NPR hide caption

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Ellen Webber for NPR

Father Devises A 'Bionic Pancreas' To Help Son With Diabetes

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The dream of epilepsy research, says neurobiologist Ivan Soltesz, is to stop seizures by manipulating only some brain cells, not all. Steve Zylius/UC Irvine Communications hide caption

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Steve Zylius/UC Irvine Communications

One Scientist's Quest To Vanquish Epileptic Seizures

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