Medical Devices : Shots - Health News Medical devices

The good old reflex hammer (like this Taylor model) might seem like an outdated medical device, but its role in diagnosing disease is still as important as ever. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

The micromotor device may someday be used to deliver antibiotics to the stomach. Angewandte Chemie International Edition hide caption

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Angewandte Chemie International Edition

This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs

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Rep. Tom Price, nominee for Secretary of Health and Human Services Secretary, faced questions about his investments in health care companies during a confirmation hearing on Wednesday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Jonathan Coleman and his son compare graphene-infused Silly Putty (left) with the unadulterated kids stuff. Naoise Culhane/Amber Center, Trinity College Dublin hide caption

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Naoise Culhane/Amber Center, Trinity College Dublin

Adding A Funny Form Of Carbon To Silly Putty Creates A Heart Monitor

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Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Pa., embraces Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., during a media briefing about the 21st Century Cures Act on Capitol Hill on Nov. 30. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

After several prominent safety problems with medical devices in hospitals emerged, the Food and Drug Administration inspected 17 hospitals across the country in late 2015 to assess their compliance with reporting regulations. Congressional Quarterly/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Congressional Quarterly/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images

Auvi-Q was pulled from the market in 2015 because of quality concerns. The drug's maker says the problems have been solved and that the product will be available in 2017. AP hide caption

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AP

Gary Linfoot was paralyzed in a helicopter crash in Iraq. He's one of the few veterans still using an iBOT, which allows him to rise up to eye level using Segway-style balancing technology. The wheelchair was discontinued in 2009, but may soon be reissued. Quil Lawrence/NPR hide caption

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Quil Lawrence/NPR

A Reboot For Wheelchair That Can Stand Up And Climb Stairs

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Chris Bettinger poses for a portrait with the edible battery his team designed at Carnegie Mellon University. Stephanie Strasburg/Tribune-Review hide caption

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Stephanie Strasburg/Tribune-Review

Scopes used to diagnose gastrointestinal problems are typically cleaned and reused. Dave King/Dorling Kindersley/Science Museum, London/Science Source hide caption

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Dave King/Dorling Kindersley/Science Museum, London/Science Source

Dartmouth College researcher Timothy Pierson holds a prototype of Wanda, which is designed to establish secure wireless connections between devices that generate data. Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College hide caption

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Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College
iStockphoto

A Fitbit Saved His Life? Well, Maybe

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