Hospitals : Shots - Health News Hospitals

"As bad as NYU is, Aetna is equally culpable because Aetna's job was to be the checks and balances and to be my advocate," said Michael Frank, seen at his home in Port Chester, N.Y. Annie Tritt for ProPublica hide caption

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Annie Tritt for ProPublica

Dr. Paul Marik (left) discusses patient care with medical students and resident physicians during morning rounds at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital in 2014 in Norfolk, Va. Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Can A Cocktail Of Vitamins And Steroids Cure A Major Killer In Hospitals?

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Cheryl Chandler says she happened to click on a viral video showing a woman wearing a hospital gown, not knowing it showed her 22-year-old daughter, Rebecca. She has mental health issues and was left outside a Baltimore hospital on a cold January night. The video recorded by a passer-by went viral. Jared Soares for NPR hide caption

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Jared Soares for NPR

'Failing Patients': Baltimore Video Highlights Crisis Of Emergency Psychiatric Care

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Free-standing ERs tend to have lower standby costs than hospital-based facilities that have to be ready to treat dire injuries. But the free-standing ERs typically receive the same Medicare rate for emergency services. sshepard/Getty Images hide caption

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sshepard/Getty Images

The CDC is trying to stop E. coli and other bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics because they can cause a deadly infection. Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Federal Efforts To Control Rare And Deadly Bacteria Working

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As a "hospital-at-home" patient, Phyllis Petruzzelli was visited twice a day by doctors and nurses who were able to perform any needed tests or bloodwork there to help her heal from pneumonia. "I'd do it again in a heartbeat," Petruzzelli says. Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Emergency rooms are seeing a jump in opioid overdoses. Timely treatment with naloxone can reverse the effects of opioids. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Jump In Overdoses Shows Opioid Epidemic Has Worsened

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Ashley Copeland (right) talks to her mom Sue Iverson in the Swedish Medical Center emergency department, near Denver. Copeland got a nerve-blocking anesthetic instead of opioids to ease her severe headache. At discharge she was advised to use over-the-counter painkillers, if necessary. John Daley / CPR News hide caption

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John Daley / CPR News

These 10 ERs Sharply Reduced Opioid Use And Still Eased Pain

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Rescue workers remove a survivor from a hospital fire on Friday in Miryang, South Korea. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

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Handout/Getty Images

Fire Rips Through South Korean Hospital, Killing Dozens Of Patients

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Doctors in Miami found that a man's tattoo expressing his end-of-life wishes was more confusing than helpful. Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

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Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine

When A Tattoo Means Life Or Death. Literally

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Colin Campbell, shown last month in his home near Los Angeles, was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease — ALS — eight years ago. He gets Medicare because of his disability, but was incorrectly told by several agencies that he couldn't use it for home care. Instead, he pays $4,000 a month for those services. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Hospitals Brace Patients For Pain To Reduce Risk Of Opioid Addiction

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Up to one half of rural residents are covered by Medicaid, says Michelle Mills, CEO of Colorado Rural Health Center. And they're typically older, poorer and sicker than city dwellers. John Daley/CPR hide caption

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John Daley/CPR

Each year, hundreds of hospitals lose 1 percent of their Medicare payments through the Hospital-Acquired Conditions Reduction Program. The penalties — now in their fourth year — were created by the Affordable Care Act to drive hospitals to improve the quality of their care. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

After two weeks of recovery from an addiction to opioids prescribed by her surgeon, Katie Herzog takes a walk with her dog, Pippen. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Should Hospitals Be Punished For Post-Surgical Patients' Opioid Addiction?

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MedStar Health clinic in Washington, D.C. An affiliated MedStar hospital is just one of many facilities throughout the U.S. that have been hit with shortages of certain medications because of recent hurricane damage to manufacturers in Puerto Rico. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Hurricane Damage To Manufacturers In Puerto Rico Affects Mainland Hospitals, Too

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