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Rescue workers remove a survivor from a hospital fire on Friday in Miryang, South Korea. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

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Handout/Getty Images

Fire Rips Through South Korean Hospital, Killing Dozens Of Patients

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Doctors in Miami found that a man's tattoo expressing his end-of-life wishes was more confusing than helpful. Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

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Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine

When A Tattoo Means Life Or Death. Literally

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Colin Campbell, shown last month in his home near Los Angeles, was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease — ALS — eight years ago. He gets Medicare because of his disability, but was incorrectly told by several agencies that he couldn't use it for home care. Instead, he pays $4,000 a month for those services. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Hospitals Brace Patients For Pain To Reduce Risk Of Opioid Addiction

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Up to one half of rural residents are covered by Medicaid, says Michelle Mills, CEO of Colorado Rural Health Center. And they're typically older, poorer and sicker than city dwellers. John Daley/CPR hide caption

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John Daley/CPR

Each year, hundreds of hospitals lose 1 percent of their Medicare payments through the Hospital-Acquired Conditions Reduction Program. The penalties — now in their fourth year — were created by the Affordable Care Act to drive hospitals to improve the quality of their care. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

After two weeks of recovery from an addiction to opioids prescribed by her surgeon, Katie Herzog takes a walk with her dog, Pippen. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Should Hospitals Be Punished For Post-Surgical Patients' Opioid Addiction?

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MedStar Health clinic in Washington, D.C. An affiliated MedStar hospital is just one of many facilities throughout the U.S. that have been hit with shortages of certain medications because of recent hurricane damage to manufacturers in Puerto Rico. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Hurricane Damage To Manufacturers In Puerto Rico Affects Mainland Hospitals, Too

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Rosemary Warnock, a registered nurse at Maine Health, exits the Merrill Auditorium voting station in Portland, Maine, early Tuesday. She said she was motivated to vote for Medicaid expansion. Ben McCanna/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben McCanna/Press Herald via Getty Images

After Maine Voters Approve Medicaid Expansion, Governor Raises Objections

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An overdose rescue kit handed out at an overdose prevention class this summer in New York City includes an injectable form of the drug naloxone. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Counting The Heavy Cost Of Care In The Age Of Opioids

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Hundreds of homes in the Coffey Park neighborhood that were destroyed by the Tubbs Fire on October 11, 2017, in Santa Rosa, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As She Evacuated Patients From The Hospital, Her Home Burned

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Roughly 80 percent of all first strokes arise from risks that people can influence with behavioral changes, doctors say — risks like high blood pressure, smoking and drug abuse. Brenda Muller/Gallo Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Brenda Muller/Gallo Images/Getty Images

Carmen Algeria, a survivor of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, was admitted to Sunrise Hospital. She had been shot in the leg and on Oct. 2 was awaiting surgery. Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images