Hospitals : Shots - Health News Hospitals

Mendocino, Calif., lures vacationing tourists and retirees. But the lone hospital on this remote stretch of coast, in nearby Fort Bragg, is struggling financially. David McSpadden/Wikimedia hide caption

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David McSpadden/Wikimedia

Mendocino Coast Fights To Keep Its Lone Hospital Afloat

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Kate Teague, a registered nurse at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, in Palo Alto, Calif., holds a premature baby's hand. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

In Caring For Sickest Babies, Doctors Now Tap Parents For Tough Calls

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Dr. Leana Wen, Baltimore's health commissioner, is eager to see hospitals in the city pitch in on public health. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

In Maryland, A Change In How Hospitals Are Paid Boosts Public Health

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Aurora Sinai Medical Center in Milwaukee has found that connecting people with primary care doctors reduces the number of emergency room visits. Courtesy of Aurora Health Care hide caption

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Courtesy of Aurora Health Care

A shuttle bus exits a secure gate at Napa State Hospital after a media tour in 2011. J.L. Sousa/ZUMAPRESS.com/Corbis hide caption

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J.L. Sousa/ZUMAPRESS.com/Corbis

5 Years After A Murder, Calif. Hospital Still Struggles With Violence

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Errors in diagnosis, such as inaccuracies or delays in making the information available, account for an estimated 10 percent of patient deaths, a blue-ribbon report says. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

University Medical Center New Orleans on Aug. 1, when the $1 billion facility welcomed its first patients. Brett Duke/The Times-Picayune/Landov hide caption

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Brett Duke/The Times-Picayune/Landov

Katrina Shut Down Charity Hospital But Led To More Primary Care

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Peter Lee, executive director of Covered California, (left) poses with his uncle, Philip Lee, and father Peter Lee (seated) at the younger Peter Lee's home in Pasadena, Calif., in 2013. Gina Ferazzi/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Gina Ferazzi/LA Times via Getty Images

Meet The California Family That Has Made Health Policy Its Business

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