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Shereese Hickson was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2012 and is unable to work. She supports herself and her son, Isaiah, on $770 a month. Shane Wynn for KHN hide caption

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Shane Wynn for KHN

Chronically Ill, Traumatically Billed: $123,019 For 2 Multiple Sclerosis Treatments

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Ochsner Baptist Medical Center in New Orleans hasn't needed device reps' help since it started using technology from a company called Sight Medical that handles inventory management. Courtesy of Sight Medical hide caption

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Courtesy of Sight Medical

Sales Reps May Be Wearing Out Their Welcome In The Operating Room

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A major study published Monday finds that widely prescribed antipsychotic drugs like haloperidol are no more effective than a placebo for treating delirium. Nehru Sulejmanovski/Getty Images hide caption

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Nehru Sulejmanovski/Getty Images

Antipsychotic Drugs Don't Ease ICU Delirium

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Marilyn Bartlett spent two years running Montana's employee health plan. She made better deals with hospitals and drug benefits managers and saved the plan from bankruptcy. Mike Albans for NPR hide caption

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Mike Albans for NPR

A Tough Negotiator Proves Employers Can Bargain Down Health Care Prices

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"The biggest challenge for me was to see how I would be a father again," says Dr. Naveed Khan, who was injured while driving an all-terrain vehicle. "With two able-bodied parents at home, it was easier." Shelby Knowles for NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for NPR

Taken For A Ride: M.D. Injured In ATV Crash Gets $56,603 Bill For Air Ambulance Trip

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The total bill for Drew Calver's four-day hospital stay at St. David's Medical Center in April 2017 was $164,941. His insurer paid $55,840, leaving Calver responsible for the unpaid balance of $108,951.31. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

Intermountain Healthcare, whose Intermountain Medical Center Patient Tower in Murray, Utah, is seen here, is a leader in the generic drug company being launched by hospitals. Courtesy of Intermountain Healthcare hide caption

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Courtesy of Intermountain Healthcare

Drew Calver, a high school history teacher and swim coach in Austin, Texas, had a heart attack at his home on April 2, 2017. A neighbor rushed him to the nearby emergency room at St. David's Medical Center, which wasn't in the school district's health plan. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

His $109K Heart Attack Bill Is Now Down To $332 After NPR Told His Story

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Michael Vigil, an oil contractor from Douglas, Wyo., traveled 250 miles to Denver to have his aortic valve replaced in May. He said he would have preferred his local hospital do the procedure. Courtesy of Michael Vigil hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Vigil

Training on how to spot human trafficking is given not only to doctors and nurses but also to registration and reception staff, social workers and security guards. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

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A-Digit/Getty Images

Proponents of hospital mergers say the change can help struggling nonprofit hospitals "thrive," with an infusion of cash to invest in updated technology and top clinical staff. But research shows the price of care, especially for low-income patients, usually rises when a hospital joins a for-profit corporation. Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images

First responders transfer patients from ambulances to Broward Health Medical Center in Ft. Lauderdale on the afternoon of Feb. 14. The hospital was on lockdown after receiving victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Jessica Bakeman /WLRN hide caption

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Jessica Bakeman /WLRN

Hospital Lockdowns Can Leave Patients' Loved Ones Locked Out

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Struggling to stay afloat, a rural hospital in Missouri took a chance on new managers. Dan Margolies/KCUR hide caption

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Dan Margolies/KCUR

Vulnerable Rural Hospitals Face Tough Decisions On Questionable Billing Schemes

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Emergencies happen at all hours, but the cost of staffing an emergency department at night is higher than by day, according to emergency care providers. Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images