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An overgrowth of Clostridium difficile bacteria can inflame the colon with a life-threatening infection. Dr. David Phillips/Getty Images/Visuals Unlimited hide caption

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Dr. David Phillips/Getty Images/Visuals Unlimited

One form of carbapenem-resistant bacteria seen in culture. CRE bacteria are blamed for 600 deaths a year in the U.S. and can withstand treatment by virtually every kind of antibiotic. CDC hide caption

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CDC

Happy patients can be a windfall for the hospitals that care for them. Laughing Stock/Corbis hide caption

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Laughing Stock/Corbis

Satisfied Patients Now Make Hospitals Richer, But Is That Fair?

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Cleveland Clinic pharmacist Katie Greenlee talks with Morgan Clay about how he should take his prescriptions when he leaves the hospital. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN/Ideastream hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN/Ideastream

Heartland Regional Medical Center in St. Joseph, Mo., is changing its name to Mosaic Life Care. It was the focus of an NPR and ProPublica investigation into its billing practices. Steve Hebert for ProPublica hide caption

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Steve Hebert for ProPublica

Senator 'Astounded' That Nonprofit Hospitals Sue Poorest Patients

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Steven Brill is a journalist who also founded Court TV, American Lawyer magazine, 10 regional legal newspapers and Brill's Content Magazine. He teaches journalism at Yale. Courtesy of Random House hide caption

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Courtesy of Random House

'America's Bitter Pill' Makes Case For Why Health Care Law 'Won't Work'

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NYU Langone Medical Center is one of the teaching hospitals being penalized by Medicare for its rate of medical errors. Joshua Bright/AP hide caption

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Joshua Bright/AP