Hospitals : Shots - Health News Hospitals

Carolyn Rossi, a registered nurse at the Hospital of Central Connecticut, says the opioid epidemic has required nurses who used to specialize in care for infants gain insights into caring for addicted mothers, as well. Rusty Kimball/Courtesy of Hartford HealthCare hide caption

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Rusty Kimball/Courtesy of Hartford HealthCare

To Help Newborns Dependent On Opioids, Hospitals Rethink Mom's Role

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Hospitals Adapt ERs To Meet Patient Demand For Routine Care

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Blue skies in San Juan, Puerto Rico belie the U.S. territory's struggle with massive debt. The islands have a generous health care program that covers nearly everyone, but economists say it has never been adequately funded. Christopher Gregory/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Gregory/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Puerto Rico's Growing Financial Crisis Threatens Health Care, Too

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Each year, between 8,000 and 9,000 people nationwide complain to the government about nursing home evictions, according to federal data. That makes evictions the leading category of all nursing home complaints. shapecharge/Getty Images hide caption

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shapecharge/Getty Images

Nursing Home Evictions Strand The Disabled In Costly Hospitals

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Most women get prenatal care from the doctor they expect will deliver the baby, which can make it difficult if the doctor and hospital are far away. Tim Hale/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Hale/Getty Images

Criminologist Joseph Richardson is skeptical that the federal government alone can solve the data problem for police shootings. "There has to be a more pioneering, innovative approach to doing it," he says. Spotmatik/iStockphoto hide caption

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Spotmatik/iStockphoto

East Cleveland medic Anthony Savoy says his city's ambulances are diverted frequently to a hospital further away, and that can add one or two minutes to response times. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

Cleveland Pressures Hospitals To Keep ERs Open To All Ambulances

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The upshot from a study of more than 75,000 low-risk births is that "childbirth in the United States is very safe regardless of where you decide to do it," says Dr. Michael Greene, who directs obstetrics at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

Giving Birth Outside A Hospital Is A Little Riskier For The Baby

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Sue McConnell is one of more than 130 transgender veterans receiving treatment at the Tucson Veterans Affairs hospital. Jimmy Jenkins/KJZZ hide caption

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Jimmy Jenkins/KJZZ

New VA Clinic Opens For Transgender Vets

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Many hospitals haven't fully implemented guidelines put forth in 2010 to minimize errors in the determination of brain death. Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images hide caption

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Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images

Researchers Find Lapses In Hospitals' Policies For Determining Brain Death

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Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy unveiled his budget to the legislature last February, but the year's expenditures were greater than income. Connecticut's leaders voted to cut hospital funding to help close the gap. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

Connecticut Governor Targets Hospital Funds To Close Budget Gap

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In response to Medicare's penalty program, UCLA Health has focused on decreasing the use of catheters at its hospitals, including at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. Wikipedia hide caption

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Wikipedia
Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Is It Safe For Medical Residents To Work 30-Hour Shifts?

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