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You may share everything with your parents, but health care providers might not be so open. Robert Lang Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Lang Photography/Getty Images

Members of Congress complained to the administration that hospitals needed more time to check the accuracy of quality ratings. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Safe Streets outreach coordinator Dante Barksdale says right after a shooting, the injured almost always talk. "Some of them want revenge, right then and there," he says. "Some of them are afraid. They're thinking about their brother or their homeboy. 'Is my man all right? He was with me!' They're real vulnerable. They got questions." Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Baltimore Sees Hospitals As Key To Breaking A Cycle Of Violence

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The entrance to Sutter Davis Hospital in Davis, Calif. Sutter Health has hospitals in more than 100 communities in Northern California; it reported $11 billion in revenue last year, with an operating profit of $287 million. Ken James/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ken James/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Carolyn Rossi, a registered nurse at the Hospital of Central Connecticut, says the opioid epidemic has required nurses who used to specialize in care for infants gain insights into caring for addicted mothers, as well. Rusty Kimball/Courtesy of Hartford HealthCare hide caption

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Rusty Kimball/Courtesy of Hartford HealthCare

To Help Newborns Dependent On Opioids, Hospitals Rethink Mom's Role

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Hospitals Adapt ERs To Meet Patient Demand For Routine Care

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Blue skies in San Juan, Puerto Rico belie the U.S. territory's struggle with massive debt. The islands have a generous health care program that covers nearly everyone, but economists say it has never been adequately funded. Christopher Gregory/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Gregory/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Puerto Rico's Growing Financial Crisis Threatens Health Care, Too

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Each year, between 8,000 and 9,000 people nationwide complain to the government about nursing home evictions, according to federal data. That makes evictions the leading category of all nursing home complaints. shapecharge/Getty Images hide caption

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shapecharge/Getty Images

Nursing Home Evictions Strand The Disabled In Costly Hospitals

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Most women get prenatal care from the doctor they expect will deliver the baby, which can make it difficult if the doctor and hospital are far away. Tim Hale/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Hale/Getty Images

Criminologist Joseph Richardson is skeptical that the federal government alone can solve the data problem for police shootings. "There has to be a more pioneering, innovative approach to doing it," he says. Spotmatik/iStockphoto hide caption

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Spotmatik/iStockphoto