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A proposed change in a formula for Medicare payments could help rural hospitals but would mean less money for hospitals in cities. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

At least 43 million Americans have overdue medical bills on their credit reports, according to a 2014 report on medical debt by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Hero Images/Getty Images/Hero Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images/Hero Images

Charges for nitrous oxide during labor and delivery haven't been standardized. Courtesy of Kara Jo Prestrud, Birth Made Beautiful hide caption

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Courtesy of Kara Jo Prestrud, Birth Made Beautiful

Bill Of The Month: $4,836 Charge For Laughing Gas During Childbirth Is No Joke

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Pharmacy technician Peggy Gillespie fills a syringe with an antibiotic at ProMedica Toledo Hospital in Toledo, Ohio, in January. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

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Tony Dejak/AP

Drugmaker Created To Reduce Shortages And Prices Unveils Its First Products

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Fort Scott, Kan., fills up on weekday afternoons as locals grab pizza, visit a coffeehouse or browse antique shops and a bookstore. Like other rural communities, the commercial areas also include empty storefronts. Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News

No Mercy: How A Kansas Town Is Grappling With Its Hospital's Closure

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Just as sleep deprivation has been shown to impair cognition, so too has it been found to dampen empathy for others. Johner Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Johner Images/Getty Images

Lenh Vuong, a clinical social worker at Los Angeles County+USC Medical Center, checks on a former John Doe patient she recently helped identify. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

Over the past decade, hospitals have been rapidly building outpatient clinics or purchasing existing independent ones. It was a lucrative business strategy because such clinics could charge higher rates, on the premise that they were part of a hospital. Medicare's recent rule change puts a damper on all that. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, incidents of serious workplace violence are four times more common in health care than in private industry. Most assaults come from patients and patients' families. Phil Fisk/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Fisk/Cultura RF/Getty Images

Facing Escalating Workplace Violence, Hospital Employees Have Had Enough

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Before it closed March 1, the 25-bed Columbia River Hospital, in Celina, Tenn., served the town of 1,500 residents. The closest hospital now is 18 miles from Celina — a 30-minute or more drive on mountain roads. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Economic Ripples: Hospital Closure Hurts A Town's Ability To Attract Retirees

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A certified nursing assistant wipes Neva Shinkle's face with chlorhexidine, an antimicrobial wash. Shinkle is a patient at Coventry Court Health Center, a nursing home in Anaheim, Calif., that is part of a multicenter research project aimed at stopping the spread of MRSA and CRE — two types of bacteria resistant to most antibiotics. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

The uncompensated care costs among Colorado hospitals dropped by more than 60 percent after the state expanded Medicaid coverage — a savings of more than $400 million statewide. But a new report asks why the hospitals didn't pass some of those savings on to patients. Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images hide caption

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Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images