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"As deductibles rise, patients have the right to know the price of health care services so they can shop around for the best deal," says Seema Verma, who heads the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and announced the Trump administration's plan this week. Kevin Wolf/AP hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP

Bacteria (purple) in the bloodstream can trigger sepsis, a life-threatening illness. Steve Gschmeissner/ScienceSource hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/ScienceSource

Regulations That Mandate Sepsis Care Appear To Have Worked In New York

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For 25 years, the federal Violence Against Women Act has required any state that wants to be eligible for certain federal grants to certify that the state covers the cost of medical forensic exams for people who have been sexually assaulted. Ann Hermes/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images hide caption

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Ann Hermes/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images

R. Alan Pritchard, one of two attorneys for Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, heads into Shelby County General Sessions Court Wednesday in Memphis. He asked the court to drop more than two dozen cases as the hospital reviews its collection policies. Andrea Morales for MLK50 hide caption

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Andrea Morales for MLK50

When the cancer clinic at Mercy Hospital Fort Scott closed in January, Karen Endicott-Coyan and other cancer patients had to continue their treatments out of town. Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News

Have Cancer, Must Travel: Patients Left In Lurch After Town's Hospital Closes

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An employee at a Methodist University Hospital is being sued by her employer for unpaid medical bills incurred before they hired her. Andrea Morales for MLK50 hide caption

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Andrea Morales for MLK50

A Tennessee Hospital Sues Its Own Employees When They Can't Pay Their Medical Bills

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An executive order President Trump signed Monday aims to make most hospital pricing more transparent to patients, long before they get the bill. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images

Two reports from the federal government have determined that many cases of abuse or neglect of elderly patients that are severe enough to require medical attention are not being reported to enforcement agencies by nursing homes or health workers — even though such reporting is required by law. Mary Smyth/Getty Images hide caption

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Mary Smyth/Getty Images

Health Workers Still Aren't Alerting Police About Likely Elder Abuse, Reports Find

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Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images

'Patients Will Die': One County's Challenge To Trump's 'Conscience Rights' Rule

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A proposed change in a formula for Medicare payments could help rural hospitals but would mean less money for hospitals in cities. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

At least 43 million Americans have overdue medical bills on their credit reports, according to a 2014 report on medical debt by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Hero Images/Getty Images/Hero Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images/Hero Images

Charges for nitrous oxide during labor and delivery haven't been standardized. Courtesy of Kara Jo Prestrud, Birth Made Beautiful hide caption

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Courtesy of Kara Jo Prestrud, Birth Made Beautiful

Bill Of The Month: $4,836 Charge For Laughing Gas During Childbirth Is No Joke

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Pharmacy technician Peggy Gillespie fills a syringe with an antibiotic at ProMedica Toledo Hospital in Toledo, Ohio, in January. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

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Tony Dejak/AP

Drugmaker Created To Reduce Shortages And Prices Unveils Its First Products

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Fort Scott, Kan., fills up on weekday afternoons as locals grab pizza, visit a coffeehouse or browse antique shops and a bookstore. Like other rural communities, the commercial areas also include empty storefronts. Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News

No Mercy: How A Kansas Town Is Grappling With Its Hospital's Closure

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