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Drew Calver, a high school history teacher and swim coach in Austin, Texas, had a heart attack at his home on April 2, 2017. A neighbor rushed him to the nearby emergency room at St. David's Medical Center, which wasn't in the school district's health plan. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

His $109K Heart Attack Bill Is Now Down To $332 After NPR Told His Story

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Michael Vigil, an oil contractor from Douglas, Wyo., traveled 250 miles to Denver to have his aortic valve replaced in May. He said he would have preferred his local hospital do the procedure. Courtesy of Michael Vigil hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Vigil

Training on how to spot human trafficking is given not only to doctors and nurses but also to registration and reception staff, social workers and security guards. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

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Proponents of hospital mergers say the change can help struggling nonprofit hospitals "thrive," with an infusion of cash to invest in updated technology and top clinical staff. But research shows the price of care, especially for low-income patients, usually rises when a hospital joins a for-profit corporation. Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images

First responders transfer patients from ambulances to Broward Health Medical Center in Ft. Lauderdale on the afternoon of Feb. 14. The hospital was on lockdown after receiving victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Jessica Bakeman /WLRN hide caption

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Jessica Bakeman /WLRN

Hospital Lockdowns Can Leave Patients' Loved Ones Locked Out

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Struggling to stay afloat, a rural hospital in Missouri took a chance on new managers. Dan Margolies/KCUR hide caption

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Dan Margolies/KCUR

Vulnerable Rural Hospitals Face Tough Decisions On Questionable Billing Schemes

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Emergencies happen at all hours, but the cost of staffing an emergency department at night is higher than by day, according to emergency care providers. Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images

"As bad as NYU is, Aetna is equally culpable because Aetna's job was to be the checks and balances and to be my advocate," said Michael Frank, seen at his home in Port Chester, N.Y. Annie Tritt for ProPublica hide caption

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Annie Tritt for ProPublica

Dr. Paul Marik (left) discusses patient care with medical students and resident physicians during morning rounds at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital in 2014 in Norfolk, Va. Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Can A Cocktail Of Vitamins And Steroids Cure A Major Killer In Hospitals?

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Cheryl Chandler says she happened to click on a viral video showing a woman wearing a hospital gown, not knowing it showed her 22-year-old daughter, Rebecca. She has mental health issues and was left outside a Baltimore hospital on a cold January night. The video recorded by a passer-by went viral. Jared Soares for NPR hide caption

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Jared Soares for NPR

'Failing Patients': Baltimore Video Highlights Crisis Of Emergency Psychiatric Care

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Free-standing ERs tend to have lower standby costs than hospital-based facilities that have to be ready to treat dire injuries. But the free-standing ERs typically receive the same Medicare rate for emergency services. sshepard/Getty Images hide caption

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sshepard/Getty Images

The CDC is trying to stop E. coli and other bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics because they can cause a deadly infection. Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Federal Efforts To Control Rare And Deadly Bacteria Working

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