Hospitals : Shots - Health News Hospitals

Emergencies happen at all hours, but the cost of staffing an emergency department at night is higher than by day, according to emergency care providers. Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images

"As bad as NYU is, Aetna is equally culpable because Aetna's job was to be the checks and balances and to be my advocate," said Michael Frank, seen at his home in Port Chester, N.Y. Annie Tritt for ProPublica hide caption

toggle caption
Annie Tritt for ProPublica

Dr. Paul Marik (left) discusses patient care with medical students and resident physicians during morning rounds at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital in 2014 in Norfolk, Va. Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Can A Cocktail Of Vitamins And Steroids Cure A Major Killer In Hospitals?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/609149556/610337678" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cheryl Chandler says she happened to click on a viral video showing a woman wearing a hospital gown, not knowing it showed her 22-year-old daughter, Rebecca. She has mental health issues and was left outside a Baltimore hospital on a cold January night. The video recorded by a passer-by went viral. Jared Soares for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jared Soares for NPR

'Failing Patients': Baltimore Video Highlights Crisis Of Emergency Psychiatric Care

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/599892160/606859358" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Free-standing ERs tend to have lower standby costs than hospital-based facilities that have to be ready to treat dire injuries. But the free-standing ERs typically receive the same Medicare rate for emergency services. sshepard/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
sshepard/Getty Images

The CDC is trying to stop E. coli and other bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics because they can cause a deadly infection. Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

toggle caption
Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Federal Efforts To Control Rare And Deadly Bacteria Working

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/599194350/599240810" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As a "hospital-at-home" patient, Phyllis Petruzzelli was visited twice a day by doctors and nurses who were able to perform any needed tests or bloodwork there to help her heal from pneumonia. "I'd do it again in a heartbeat," Petruzzelli says. Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Emergency rooms are seeing a jump in opioid overdoses. Timely treatment with naloxone can reverse the effects of opioids. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Jump In Overdoses Shows Opioid Epidemic Has Worsened

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/590923149/591266978" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ashley Copeland (right) talks to her mom Sue Iverson in the Swedish Medical Center emergency department, near Denver. Copeland got a nerve-blocking anesthetic instead of opioids to ease her severe headache. At discharge she was advised to use over-the-counter painkillers, if necessary. John Daley / CPR News hide caption

toggle caption
John Daley / CPR News

These 10 ERs Sharply Reduced Opioid Use And Still Eased Pain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/587666283/590546443" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rescue workers remove a survivor from a hospital fire on Friday in Miryang, South Korea. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Handout/Getty Images

Fire Rips Through South Korean Hospital, Killing Dozens Of Patients

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/580926197/580933946" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript